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Major cull of feral camels underway
Feral camels are said to emerging from the arid landscape into nearby communities in search of water.
Cull not linked to Australia’s recent bushfires

A major cull of thousands of feral camels is underway in South Australia owing to extreme heat and drought.

The move comes after aboriginal communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) region said thousands of camels had been damaging their houses and other buildings.

In a statement, the APY said that feral camels are emerging from an arid landscape and moving into nearby communities in search of water. The cull is expected to last around five days and is being supported by the Department for Environment and Water.

APY's general manager Richard King said: “There is extreme pressure on remote Aboirignal [sic] communities in the APY lands and their pastoral [livestock] operations as the camels search for water. Given ongoing dry conditions and the large camel congregations threatening all of the main APY communities and infrastructure, immediate camel control is needed."

According to BBC News, the cull is not connected to Australia’s recent bushfires. Large regions of Australia have been in drought for many years.

APY executive board member Marita Baker, said: “We have been stuck in stinking hot and uncomfortable conditions, feeling unwell, because all the camels are coming in and knocking down fences, getting in around the houses and trying to get water through air-conditioners.

"They are roaming the streets looking for water. We are worried about the safety of the young children”.

The cull of the camels, along with some feral horses, is being carried out by aerial marksmen from Australia’s Department for Environment and Water.

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Celebrity chefs urge public to get baking to support Cats Protection fundraiser

News Story 1
 In support of Cats Protection's Pawsome Afternoon Tea fundraiser, Masterchef winner Tim Anderson and Great British Bake Off star Kim-Joy have shared biscuit recipes to help keen bakers raise money for needy cats across April.

The celebrity chefs are both cat owners and have said that they hope this fundraiser will help to raise awareness of cats in need and the importance of adopting a cat, rather than buying one.

This is the fourth year Cats Protection has run its Pawsome Afternoon Tea campaign, which encourages people to hold tea parties, bake sales and fundraising events to help raise money for the charity.

To view the recipes and other fundraising resources please visit the Cats Protection website. 

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News Shorts
BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.