Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Major cull of feral camels underway
Feral camels are said to emerging from the arid landscape into nearby communities in search of water.
Cull not linked to Australia’s recent bushfires

A major cull of thousands of feral camels is underway in South Australia owing to extreme heat and drought.

The move comes after aboriginal communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) region said thousands of camels had been damaging their houses and other buildings.

In a statement, the APY said that feral camels are emerging from an arid landscape and moving into nearby communities in search of water. The cull is expected to last around five days and is being supported by the Department for Environment and Water.

APY's general manager Richard King said: “There is extreme pressure on remote Aboirignal [sic] communities in the APY lands and their pastoral [livestock] operations as the camels search for water. Given ongoing dry conditions and the large camel congregations threatening all of the main APY communities and infrastructure, immediate camel control is needed."

According to BBC News, the cull is not connected to Australia’s recent bushfires. Large regions of Australia have been in drought for many years.

APY executive board member Marita Baker, said: “We have been stuck in stinking hot and uncomfortable conditions, feeling unwell, because all the camels are coming in and knocking down fences, getting in around the houses and trying to get water through air-conditioners.

"They are roaming the streets looking for water. We are worried about the safety of the young children”.

The cull of the camels, along with some feral horses, is being carried out by aerial marksmen from Australia’s Department for Environment and Water.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

BEVA gives vets access to free membership for three months

News Story 1
 BEVA has announced that it is cutting membership renewal charges for the next three months in order to support all veterinary professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Memberships for all existing BEVA members will be extended until 30 June 2020. Veterinary professionals who are not members of BEVA will also be able to sign up for a free membership until 30 June 2020.

BEVA president Tim Mair said: "In this extraordinary time of global crisis our profession, as with many industries, is under immense pressure. By offering free membership we are giving equine vets easy access to a wealth of supportive resources and online CPD."

To sign up please visit the BEVA website.

Image (c) BEVA. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BSAVA rolls out CPD resources and benefits in absence of Congress

A package of CPD resources and benefits are set to be rolled out on BSAVA's social media channels over the coming days in a bid to fill the gap left by the cancellation of BSAVA Congress.

The package includes a 10 discount voucher on all printed manuals and access to the BSAVA Library. BSAVA said that it will also be recording more than 100 hours of planned Congress lectures over the following weeks so that vets don't completely miss out on the Congress experience.

The resource, titled Congress on Demand will be ready in early May.