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Vets urged to be aware of the signs of animal abuse
‘Veterinarians must be alert to recognise signs of animal abuse' - Ira Roth.

Paper describes abuse case first diagnosed as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

Veterinary professionals are being urged to be aware of the signs of animal abuse and to understand the link between human and animal abuse.

Writing in the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, vets from the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine describe a case of animal abuse, which was first diagnosed as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease.

On initial presentation, a dog - a one-year-old male shitzu - was non-weight bearing in the right limb. An ophthalmic exam also revealed a corneal ulcer in the right eye and blood in the anterior chamber.

Radiographs of the right limb indicated avascular necrosis (AVN) on the right hip, with resilient fracture and possible AVN on the left side.

Twenty days later, the dog returned for evaluation of acute lameness in the left leg. Radiographs revealed a left display femur Salter-Harris type II fracture, a non-disposed healing right pubic fracture and a healing right zygomatic arch transverse fracture.

‘The dog's initial injuries were attributed to a routine fall at home, and radiographic interpretation suggested that this was plausible,’ writes author Ira Roth, a clinical assistant professor in the department of small animal medicine and surgery.

'Subsequent patient visits, evaluation of additional injuries, and interviews with the owner indicated that both animal and domestic abuse had occurred. Veterinarians must be alert to recognise signs of animal abuse and must be aware of the connection between animal and domestic abuse'.

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New York to ban sale of foie gras

News Story 1
 New York City councillors have voted overwhelmingly in favour of legislation that will see the ban of foie gras in the city. The move, which comes in response to animal cruelty concerns, will take effect in 2022.


 Councillor Carlina Rivera, who sponsored the legislation, told the New York Times that her bill “tackles the most inhumane process” in the commercial food industry. “This is one of the most violent practices, and it’s done for a purely luxury product,” she said.


 Foie gras is a food product made of the liver of a goose or duck that has been fattened, often by force-feeding. New York City is one of America’s largest markets for the product, with around 1,000 restaurants currently offering it on their menu. 

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Humane Slaughter Association student scholarships open for applications

Applications for the Humane Slaughter Association’s student/trainee Dorothy Sidley Memorial Scholarships are now open.

The Scholarships provide funding to enable students or trainees in the industry to undertake a project aimed at improving the welfare of food animals during marketing, transport and slaughter. The project may be carried out as an integral part of a student's coursework over an academic year, or during the summer break.

The deadline for applications is midnight on the 28 February 2020. To apply and for further information visit www.hsa.org.uk/grants or contact the HSA office.