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Gene study offers hope for treating fatal illness in children and dogs
Using SingleCut CRISPR gene editing, they managed to modify the dogs’ own DNA so they began producing dystrophin again.

Doctors and vets team up to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Vets and medics say they have made a significant breakthrough in the search for a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) - a fatal disease that affects children and dogs.

Scientists from the Royal Veterinary College and UT Southwestern Medical Centre used gene editing techniques in dogs, to restore the production of a protein that is absent in DMD patients.

DMD is the most common fatal genetic disease in children and it also occurs in many dog breeds. Patients with the disease produce almost no dystrophin, a protein that helps to protect muscle fibres and the heart when they contract. As a result, the patient’s muscles are damaged, leading to an inability to walk, skeletal deformities and heart failure.

The team said they may have come up with a single intravenous injection to treat the most common genetic mutations.

A naturally occurring mutation in the dystrophin gene was found in a dog that was being treated at the RVC’s Small Animal Referral Hospital, and the team are now working with the dog’s relatives. Using SingleCut CRISPR gene editing, they managed to modify the dogs’ own DNA so they began producing dystrophin again.

In a dog that received the highest dose, the cardiac muscles restored dystrophin protein to levels up to 92 per cent of the normal amount after treatment.

Scientists believe this is the first time this type of gene editing therapy has been used after birth in an animal larger than a rodent. It is hoped there will be a human application, after long-term research, efficacy and safety testing.

Richard Piercy, professor of comparative neuromuscular disease at the RVC, said: “There is more work to be done, but with this exciting breakthrough, we feel we are a significant step closer to finding an effective treatment.
 
“A great many genetic diseases affect humans, dogs and other species - many, like DMD - with tragic consequences and this form of gene editing treatment might well be applicable in many of them. We’re hopeful that we’re paving the way for future research into treating some of the most serious genetic conditions that affect us today.”

Preliminary findings have been published in the journal Science.

Image © RVC
 

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Stephen Fry lends voice to frog conservation film

News Story 1
 Comedian and author Stephen Fry has lent his voice to a new animation that hopes to raise awareness of deadly ranavirus, which is threatening the UK’s frogs.

Research by ZSL, who created the short film, suggests that at least 20 per cent of ranavirus cases over the past three decades, could be attributed to human introductions. This includes pond owners introducing fish, frog spawn and plants from other environments.

Amphibian disease expert Dr Stephen Price said: “People can help stop the spread by avoiding moving potentially infected material such as spawn, tadpoles, pond water and plants into their own pond. Disinfecting footwear or pond nets before using them elsewhere will also help.” 

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Scotland to fund OV training

The Scottish Government has revealed it will fund training for new Official Veterinarians (OVs), covering the Essential Skills, Statutory Surveillance and TB Testing.

Funding will also be provided for the revalidation of Essential Skills, as well as TB Testing for existing OVs. This is the second round of financial support from the Scottish Government for OVs.

BVA president Simon Doherty said he is “delighted” with the announcement.

“Official Veterinarians’ work in safeguarding animal health and welfare and ensuring food safety is invaluable,” he added. “This announcement has come at a crucial time, with Brexit and an uncertain future ahead, the role of OVs will be more important than ever in enabling the UK’s trade in animal products.