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European pet food industry adopts new guidelines
Dog eating
FEDIAF updates its publicly available nutritional guidelines every year.

Safety guide incorporates new legal requirements

An improved pet food safety guide and updated nutritional guidelines for cats and dogs have been adopted by the European Pet Food Industry Federation (FEDIAF).

The guidelines were presented and agreed at the European Pet Food Industry Federation’s annual meeting in Manchester (June 2017).

“We are proud having adopted an improved pet food safety guide as well as updated nutritional guidelines for cats and dogs,” said FEDIAF president Marinus Pannevis.

Safety guidance

The FEDIAF safety guide has been updated to incorporate new legal requirements and represents a manual for manufacturers throughout the EU for producing safe products.

It covers all elements of production, from training personnel and using machinery to raw materials and contaminants. Once endorsed by the EU, it will be posted on the FEDIAF website for free download.

Nutritional guidance

FEDIAF updates its publicly available nutritional guidelines every year. Compiled by renowned scientists from European veterinary schools and universities, the guide is a practical tool for producers to achieve the right quantities and balance of nutrients.

It also provides advice on how to conduct product analyses or feeding protocols and on energy requirements.

 

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Classroom pets on the decline

News Story 1
 New research has found there are fewer pets in UK classrooms than in previous generations - despite 88 per cent of parents believing it significantly helps a child’s social skills and development.

More than half of the parents surveyed by Pets at Home (51 per cent) had a class pet as a child, compared to 46 per cent of children today.

The survey also found that non-traditional animals such as chickens, tadpoles, caterpillars and stick insects are becoming increasingly popular alternatives as classroom pets.  

News Shorts
BVA survey seeks views on surveillance

Vets who use veterinary scanning surveillance networks are being asked to complete a survey to help ensure the networks are fully able to protect animals in the UK.

‘Surveillance use, understanding and engagement across the veterinary profession’ is the first of a series of surveillance surveys that will also include localised surveys for Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Drafted by members of BVA’s Surveillance Working Group, it will run until Friday, 31 August 2017. Data collected will inform BVA’s policy position ensuring it is representative of disease surveillance across the UK.