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RVC issues warning over microchip case
microchip in dog's brain
An exemption certificate can be provided in cases where, in the vet's professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

Vets highlight potential complications of microchipping small dogs
 
Small animal neurologists at the RVC's Queen Mother Hospital for Animals are highlighting the potential complications associated with microchipping very small dogs, following a recent case.

A seven-week-old female Chihuahua, weighing just 750g, was referred to the hospital after a microchip was accidentally placed through the caudal aspect of the skull, into the rostral brainstem. Due to the chip's location, the decision was made to leave it in place.

The puppy initially showed marked neurological dysfunction as a result of traumatic brain injury, but since then a remarkable improvement has been observed and vets say there is no apparent compromise to the animal's welfare.

The microchip was placed by an implanter, trained and approved under section nine of the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015. The regulations, which came into force in April of this year, make it a legal requirement for all dogs to be microchipped by the age of eight weeks.

Writing in Vet Record, neurologists said they wanted to raise awareness of the certificate of exemption, which is available from Defra. The certificate can be provided by a veterinary surgeon in cases where, in their professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

They advised implanters to seek the advice of a veterinary surgeon if they are unsure about the suitability of a dog for microchip implantation.

Image © RVC

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Veterinary Evidence Student Awards winners revealed

News Story 1
 The first winners of the RCVS Knowledge Veterinary Evidence Student Awards have been revealed.

Molly Vasanthakumar scooped first prize for her knowledge summary comparing the ecological impact of woven versus disposable drapes. She found that there is not enough evidence that disposable synthetics reduce the risk of surgical site.

Second prize went to Honoria Brown of the University of Cambridge, for her paper: ‘Can hoof wall temperature and digital pulse pressure be used as sensitive non-invasive diagnostic indicators of acute laminitis onset?’

Edinburgh’s Jacqueline Oi Ping Tong won third prize for critically appraising the evidence for whether a daily probiotic improved clinical outcomes in dogs with idiopathic diarrhoea. The papers have all achieved publication in RCVS Knowledge’s peer-reviewed journal, Veterinary Evidence.  

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News Shorts
Animal Welfare Foundation seeks new trustees

The Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF) seeks three new trustees to help drive the charity’s mission to improve animal welfare through veterinary science, education and debate.

Veterinary and animal welfare professionals from across the UK may apply, particularly those with experience in equine and small animal practice and research management. Trustees must attend at least two meetings a year, as well as the annual AWF Discussion Forum in London.

For more information about the role, visit www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk. Applications close at midnight on 13 August 2019.