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RVC issues warning over microchip case
microchip in dog's brain
An exemption certificate can be provided in cases where, in the vet's professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

Vets highlight potential complications of microchipping small dogs
 
Small animal neurologists at the RVC's Queen Mother Hospital for Animals are highlighting the potential complications associated with microchipping very small dogs, following a recent case.

A seven-week-old female Chihuahua, weighing just 750g, was referred to the hospital after a microchip was accidentally placed through the caudal aspect of the skull, into the rostral brainstem. Due to the chip's location, the decision was made to leave it in place.

The puppy initially showed marked neurological dysfunction as a result of traumatic brain injury, but since then a remarkable improvement has been observed and vets say there is no apparent compromise to the animal's welfare.

The microchip was placed by an implanter, trained and approved under section nine of the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015. The regulations, which came into force in April of this year, make it a legal requirement for all dogs to be microchipped by the age of eight weeks.

Writing in Vet Record, neurologists said they wanted to raise awareness of the certificate of exemption, which is available from Defra. The certificate can be provided by a veterinary surgeon in cases where, in their professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

They advised implanters to seek the advice of a veterinary surgeon if they are unsure about the suitability of a dog for microchip implantation.

Image © RVC

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Stephen Fry lends voice to frog conservation film

News Story 1
 Comedian and author Stephen Fry has lent his voice to a new animation that hopes to raise awareness of deadly ranavirus, which is threatening the UK’s frogs.

Research by ZSL, who created the short film, suggests that at least 20 per cent of ranavirus cases over the past three decades, could be attributed to human introductions. This includes pond owners introducing fish, frog spawn and plants from other environments.

Amphibian disease expert Dr Stephen Price said: “People can help stop the spread by avoiding moving potentially infected material such as spawn, tadpoles, pond water and plants into their own pond. Disinfecting footwear or pond nets before using them elsewhere will also help.” 

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Scotland to fund OV training

The Scottish Government has revealed it will fund training for new Official Veterinarians (OVs), covering the Essential Skills, Statutory Surveillance and TB Testing.

Funding will also be provided for the revalidation of Essential Skills, as well as TB Testing for existing OVs. This is the second round of financial support from the Scottish Government for OVs.

BVA president Simon Doherty said he is “delighted” with the announcement.

“Official Veterinarians’ work in safeguarding animal health and welfare and ensuring food safety is invaluable,” he added. “This announcement has come at a crucial time, with Brexit and an uncertain future ahead, the role of OVs will be more important than ever in enabling the UK’s trade in animal products.