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Staring down seagulls could save your chips, study finds

Researchers discover way to stop gulls snatching your food
News Story 1
Chatter box A group of endangered turtles have found a new home at London Zoo after being rescued from smugglers.

The four big-headed turtles arrived at the zoo at the end of last year, after smugglers tried to illegally import them to Canada, labelled as toys.

One of the turtles, named Lady Triệu after a Vietnamese warrioress, has moved to a new exhibit in the zoo’s reptile house. She is the only one of her kind in a UK zoo.

Big-headed turtles have such large heads that they cannot pull them back into their shells. To compensate, they have armour plating from head to tail and a very sharp beak to fend off predators. They are ranked number 18 on ZSL’s EDGE of Existence reptile list, which puts threatened species at the forefront of conservation action. Image © ZSL  Chatter box

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One Health News
Osteosarcoma genetically similar in dogs and human children - study
Osteosarcoma genetically similar in dogs and human children - study

Findings could lead to better treatments
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Garden snails offer hope for new antibiotic
Garden snails offer hope for new antibiotic

Snail mucus reveals proteins that could treat infections
Antimicrobial properties found in scorpion venom
Antimicrobial properties found in scorpion venom

Compounds kill staph and drug-resistant TB bacteria - study
Chicken study sheds light on childhood eye disease
Chicken study sheds light on childhood eye disease

New genes identified that are linked to ocular coloboma
Parasitic fish could lead to more effective brain disease treatments
Parasitic fish could lead to more effective brain disease treatments

Sea lamprey molecules may help to deliver drugs
AMR gene spreads among pets at UK vet hospital
AMR gene spreads among pets at UK vet hospital

Practices urged to ensure adequate cleaning to reduce transmission
Dog and human osteoarthritis link - study
Dog and human osteoarthritis link - study

‘One Health’ study could lead to new treatments
Osteosarcoma study set to benefit dogs and children
Osteosarcoma study set to benefit dogs and children

Researchers to explore the combination of immunotherapy and radiation
Gene mutation causes sight loss in dogs and humans
Gene mutation causes sight loss in dogs and humans

Study finds ABCA4 mutation causes retinal degenerative diseases
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News Shorts
RCVS Fellowship board chair elections get underway

Voting for the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Chair election is now underway. This year four candidates are standing for election, including Dr Robert Huey, Professor John Innes, Professor Liz Mossop and Professor Ian Ramsey.

The Chair will attend and preside over Fellowship meetings and take the lead in consolidating the Fellowship’s position as the learned society of the RCVS. Fellows will receive an email containing a link to the online voting form, as well as candidates’ details and manifestos. Voting closes at 5pm on Thursday, 5 September.

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