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Lest we forget
Dogs Trust's chief executive, Owen Sharp, and 'Peanut' at the memorial
Fallen animals in war remembered

Over 16 million animals served in the First World War. They were used for transport, communication and companionship.

Horses, donkeys, mules and camels carried food, water, ammunition and medical supplies to men at the front, and dogs and pigeons carried messages. Canaries were used to detect poisonous gas, and cats and dogs were trained to hunt rats in the trenches.

On Friday 8 November, two- and four-legged guests gathered at the fifteenth Animals in War Memorial event in Hyde Park, London to pay their respects to the animals that have served and continue to serve in conflicts throughout the world.

Organised by Dogs Trust and the Petplan Charitable Trust, the event was attended by representatives from the animal welfare sector as well animals including horses from the Household Cavalry and Dogs Trust rescue dog, Peanut, a terrier cross.

Guest readers included author, Jilly Cooper, scholar and historian, Dr Hilda Kean and BBC correspondent, Gordon Corera, as well as four school children who read poetry they had written especially for the event.

Dogs Trust chief executive, Owen Sharp, commented: “It is incredibly moving to see so many organisations coming together each year to commemorate the immense bravery of the animals that served alongside our soldiers in battle. We believe that it is important that we continue to remember the animals of war and ensure they are never forgotten.”

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Vets confirm further five cases of Alabama rot

News Story 1
 Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists has confirmed a further five cases of Cutaneous Renal Glomerular Vasculopathy, also known as Alabama rot.

The cases have been confirmed in Wallingford (Oxfordshire), Horsham (West Sussex), Hungerford (Berkshire - two dogs) and Malmesbury (Wiltshire). It brings the total number of confirmed cases to 198 since 2012. There have been 23 cases so far this year.

Signs that a dog has been affected by the disease include skin lesions on the lower limbs or mouth/tongue, leading to kidney failure. While investigations into the cause of the condition are ongoing, owners are being urged to wash their dog after wet or muddy walks.  

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News Shorts
WSAVA launches certificate programme focusing on companion animals in One Health

The first certificate programme focusing specifically on the role of companion animals in One Health has been launched by the One Health Committee (OHC) of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA).

The online programme, which is free of charge for WSAVA members, has been developed in recognition of the growing impact of companion animals in human society. Pet ownership is becoming more popular globally, and this has increased the implications for One Health, regarding the human-companion animal bond. The WSAVA OHC hopes that this course will bridge the knowledge gap between veterinary surgeons and human physicians. New modules are being added weekly, with a total of 20 modules expected to be available by early 2020.