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Bayer issues warning over fake Seresto collars
Bayer says the Seresto collar has become a prime target for fraudsters.
Vets urged to help identify and report counterfeits 

Bayer is making vets aware of a growing problem with counterfeit Seresto flea and tick collars. The company has released a video to help vets identify the illegal products.

The Seresto collar promises to protect pets from fleas and ticks for up to eight months, but Bayer says it has become a prime target for fraudsters.

“It is something we have been dealing with on a smaller scale for a while, but is becoming a more prominent problem with the increasing popularity of the product in the UK,” said Hannah Watts, senior brand manager for the product.

“Illegal products are damaging for everyone: for companies who invest heavily in bringing safe, efficacious products to market only for them to be undersold, for pet owners who waste money buying illegal products that don’t work, and for pets who receive treatments and preventatives that do not promote their health, but instead may even pose a risk to it.”

The company has launched a campaign to educate pet owners on where to buy the product safely. It says vets can play a key role in helping to stamp out the illegal products, by identifying and reporting the fake collars when they come across them in consultation with pet owners.

Hannah Watts added: “We want to ensure vets are aware that counterfeit products are out there, and equip them with the knowledge to be able to identify them, particularly where a pet owner has purchased an illegal collar under the impression it is Seresto, only to experience a treatment failure, where these animals may be presented to a vet.

“It is only if we are informed about these cases, we can get to the root of the problem, and ensure more pets and their owners don’t fall victim.”

Bayer have released the following video to help vets identify fake collars:

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Rare chimp birth announced at Edinburgh Zoo

News Story 1
 The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) welcomed the birth of a critically endangered western chimpanzee on Monday 3 February at Edinburgh Zoo's Budongo Trail.

The baby girl will be named in the coming days through a public vote, and staff will carry out a paternity test during its first health check to determine the father.

Mother Heleen's first infant, Velu, was born in 2014, making this new baby only the second chimpanzee born in Scotland for more than 20 years.

Budongo Trail team leader Donald Gow said: "While we celebrate every birth, this one is particularly special because our new arrival is a critically endangered Western chimpanzee, a rare subspecies of chimpanzee."

Image (c) RZSS/Donald Gow. 

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BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.