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New insights on why cats eat grass
'...Regular, instinctive plant eating would have an adaptive role in maintaining a tolerable intestinal parasite load...'
Scientists say the trait could be borrowed from wild ancestors 

Cats may eat grass due to an innate predisposition, passed down from their wild ancestors, a new survey of cat owners suggests.

Scientists from the University of California, Davis, carried out a survey of 1,021 cat owners who were able to observe their cat’s behaviour for three or more hours a day.

The findings were presented at the 53rd Congress of the International Society for Applied Ethology (5-9 August), which took place in Norway.

Seventy-one per cent of cats were seen eating plant matter at least six times, while 61 per cent did so more than 10 times. Only 11 per cent were never seen eating plants. Among the cats seen eating plants 10 times, 67 per cent were estimated to eat them daily or weekly.

The majority of respondents (91 per cent) said their cat almost always appeared normal before eating plants. However, 27 per cent said their cat vomited after eating plant material.

Scientists found that younger cats (aged three or under) were more likely to indulge in daily plant eating, compared to 27 per cent of cats aged four or above. Just 11 per cent of the younger cats were seen to frequently vomit after eating plants, compared to a significantly higher 30 per cent of older cats.

The research team said their findings are similar to those reported in dogs, but they do not support the popular theory that pets often eat grass to induce vomiting when they feel ill. Scientists said the findings also do not support the idea that young animals ‘learn’ plant eating from older animals.

Instead, the conclusion offered by the research team is that cats are innately predisposed to eating plants. There are numerous reports of regular plant eating in wild ancestors, which is mostly shown by the non-digestible grass and other plant parts seen in their scats. Studies of primates show that non-digestible plants purge the intestinal system of helminthic parasites.

Researchers concluded: ‘Given that virtually all wild carnivores carry an intestinal parasite load, regular, instinctive plant eating would have an adaptive role in maintaining a tolerable intestinal parasite load, whether or not the animal senses the parasites.’

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Petplan Veterinary Awards 2020 open for nominations

News Story 1
 Nominations are open for the 2020 Petplan Veterinary Awards, a prestigious event that pays recognition to some of the UKs most notable veterinary professionals.

We have been recognising the brilliant work of the UKs veterinary professionals through the Petplan Veterinary Awards for 21 years now and every year the standard of entries just gets higher, said James Barnes, head of sales and partnerships at Petplan.

To nominate a colleague for the awards visit petplanvet.co.uk/vetawards, before nominations close on 16th January 2020. Winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on 2 April 2020 in Birmingham. 

Click here for more...
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BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.