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Garden snails offer hope for new antibiotic
"We think that it might be possible to incorporate the purified protein into a cream to treat deep burn wounds and possibly an aerosol to treat lung infections.”

Snail mucus reveals proteins that could treat infections

Proteins found in the mucus of garden snails could offer hope for a new antibiotic, scientists say.

Research published in the British Journal of Biomedical Science suggests the proteins could directly lead to a new antibiotic cream for deep burn wounds, and an aerosol for lung infections seen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF).

Dr Sarah Pitt from the University of Brighton began collecting the frothy mucus from brown garden snails and testing it for antibacterial activity against a panel of bacteria.

In previous work she had found the mucus inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a very important cause of lung infections in patients with CF. Antibiotic resistant strains of the bacterium are becoming increasing common, opening up a need for new drugs.

Working with colleagues at Kings College London, Dr Pitt separated sterile solutions of proteins known as protein fractions in a novel way, so that smaller portions could be sent for antimicrobial testing. The team were surprised to find that fractions containing some smaller proteins also worked against the bacteria.

“Matching them with the international data base of proteins, we found that no one had reported them before, so they are newly identified,” Dr Pitt said.

However, further research is needed: “If we can make the proteins artificially in the lab, we can try and work out what they are doing to the bacterium,” she added.

"We think that it might be possible to incorporate the purified protein into a cream to treat deep burn wounds and possibly an aerosol to treat lung infections.”

 

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BEVA gives vets access to free membership for three months

News Story 1
 BEVA has announced that it is cutting membership renewal charges for the next three months in order to support all veterinary professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Memberships for all existing BEVA members will be extended until 30 June 2020. Veterinary professionals who are not members of BEVA will also be able to sign up for a free membership until 30 June 2020.

BEVA president Tim Mair said: "In this extraordinary time of global crisis our profession, as with many industries, is under immense pressure. By offering free membership we are giving equine vets easy access to a wealth of supportive resources and online CPD."

To sign up please visit the BEVA website.

Image (c) BEVA. 

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BSAVA rolls out CPD resources and benefits in absence of Congress

A package of CPD resources and benefits are set to be rolled out on BSAVA's social media channels over the coming days in a bid to fill the gap left by the cancellation of BSAVA Congress.

The package includes a 10 discount voucher on all printed manuals and access to the BSAVA Library. BSAVA said that it will also be recording more than 100 hours of planned Congress lectures over the following weeks so that vets don't completely miss out on the Congress experience.

The resource, titled Congress on Demand will be ready in early May.