Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Genetically-modified chickens offer hope for cheaper drugs
Chickens could be used as a cheaper method for producing high-quality research drugs.

New method produces therapeutic proteins as part of the egg white

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute have genetically-modified chickens to produce human proteins in their eggs.

It is hoped the method could one day offer a cost-effective solution for producing certain drugs, including therapies for treating cancer.

The team found that high quantities of the proteins needed for the drugs could be recovered from each egg using a purification system. The drugs they recovered worked as well as if the same proteins were produced using existing methods.

Their findings suggest that chickens could be used as a cheaper method for producing high-quality research drugs. Looking ahead it is also hoped that the drugs could be used in patients.

The team set out to produce high-quality proteins for use in scientific research. They did not witness any adverse effects on the chickens themselves, which continued to lay eggs as normal.

Scientists already use eggs to produce vaccinations, such as the influenza vaccine. But the new method differs because the proteins are produced as part of the egg white.

In this study, three eggs were enough to develop a dose of the drug that is clinically relevant. With chickens laying up to around 300 eggs per year, researchers say the approach could be more cost-effective than current methods.

The two proteins the team have been focusing on are IFNalpha2a, which has powerful anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects, and macrophage-CSF, which can stimulate the repair of damaged tissues.

Professor Helen Sang of the Roslin Institute said: “We are not yet producing medicines for people, but this study shows that chickens are commercially viable for producing proteins suitable for drug discovery studies and other applications in biotechnology.”

Dr Lissa Herron, head of the Avian Biopharming Business Institute at Roslin Technologies, added: “We are excited to develop this technology to its full potential, not just for human therapies in the future but also in the fields of research and animal health.”

The findings are published in the journal BMC Biotechnology. 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Public urged to provide homes for swifts

News Story 1
 The RSPB is calling on the public to help provide new homes for swifts, as figures show the birds' numbers have fallen to less than half what they were 20 years ago.

Swifts arrive in the UK late April-May and can spend up to three months in the country. The RSPB attributes the birds’ decline to modern buildings, which lack the nooks and crannies they need to build nests.

While some house builders have agreed to integrate swift homes into new buildings, the RSPB believes more can be done to help this incredible bird. 'Just, 1,000 additional new nest boxes could make a difference’, the charity said.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Detection time for omeprazole reduced to 48 hours in racehorses

The British Horseracing Authority (BHA) has announced that the detection time for omeprazole has been reduced from 72 hours to 48 hours. This is effective from 1 February 2019.

Omeprazole can be prescribed for the management of gastric ulcers in racehorses; however, studies have recently become available that show no direct effect of omeprazole on performance.

Tim Morris, the Authority’s Director of Equine Science and Welfare, commented: “Medication control in horse racing is essential to allow treatment for good welfare but also to ensure fair racing by medication withdrawal before racing. Trainers have asked for more information, especially on anti-ulcer medications, and we have used existing information to make a harmonised detection time for omeprazole available as soon as we could.”