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RSPCA set for a surge in abandoned animals
Calls to the RSPCA about abandoned animals spiked by almost 50 per cent from June to August last year.
Figures show summer 2017 saw a huge spike in callouts

The RSPCA is preparing itself for a surge in abandoned animals as new figures show summer 2017 was an incredibly busy time for the animal charity.

According to the figures, calls to the RSPCA about abandoned animals spiked by almost 50 per cent from June to August last year, compared to the colder months.

The figures also show the number of abandoned animals taken in by the RSPCA peaked in June 2017, with 850 dumped animals rescued.

Summer is the peak season for the RSPCA and the warmer months of 2017 saw more than 10,000 calls to its 24-hour emergency hotline - that’s one every 12 minutes. The calls involved cats tied up in bags, horses abandoned at the roadside and dogs dumped out with the rubbish.

“With the number of calls rising and an increase in the number of animals collected, we are facing another welfare crisis this year as we head into the summer months,” explained RSPCA assistant director of inspectorate Dermot Murphy.

“Last summer our team of inspectors and officers investigated more complaints of abandoned animals than they had done for two years which shows a worrying trend that things might be getting worse.

“We try to help as many animals as we can but we have just 332 inspectors which means one inspector for every 162,000 people so we have to prioritise the animals who are suffering most.”

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Report: A third of Welsh birds are in decline

News Story 1
 A report by RSPB Cymru and partnering ornithology organisations has revealed that a third of bird species in Wales are in significant decline.

90 per cent of Wales is farmed and there is now pressure to implement new land management policies that will aid in nature restoration.

Patrick Lindley, Maritime Ornithologist for Natural Resources Wales, commented: “The problems that confront UK birds, whether they are breeding or non-breeding, are pressure and threats that confront entire ecosystems.

“Birds are a great indicator to the health of our environment. The continued population declines of birds of farmed, woodland and upland habitats suggest there are large geographic themes that are having a detrimental impact.”  

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News Shorts
British sheep meat to be exported to India in new agreement

The UK government has secured a new export deal of sheep meat to India.

In 2017, UK sheep meat exports were worth £386 million. This new agreement is predicted to increase this value by £6 million over the next five years.

With a range of meat cuts due to be exported, the deal is seen by international trade secretary, Dr Liam Fox MP, as “another vote of confidence in our world-leading food and drink”.