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Scottish MP rejects proposals for ban on live animal exports
The government is currently considering a ban on the export of live animals for slaughter.

Fergus Ewing says move could harm the livestock sector

Scotland’s rural economy secretary Fergus Ewing has announced his opposition to proposals for a ban on live animal exports.

The government is currently considering a ban on the export of live animals for slaughter and is due to launch a consultation in the Spring. But Mr Ewing is reported to have said that he will not support anything that creates further challenges for the Scottish farming industry.

According to BBC News, Mr Ewing believes the move could cause “substantial harm” to the livestock sector, as well as farming on neighbouring islands.

He said: “The Scottish government will, therefore, not support the banning of live exports of livestock, but will remain committed to the welfare of all animals during transport adhering to the current rigorous standards which apply – standards and regulations provided by the EU, that are already world class and protect us all through animal, plant and chemical health measures and enabling our produce to be traded around the world.”

Responding, Scottish animal protection charity OneKind said that the comments are "unsubstantiated and out of touch with the Scottish public".

“A ban on the export of live animals outside of the UK would have no impact whatsoever on the ability of farmers on the islands to sell their livestock within the UK, nor would it prevent businesses selling meat products outside of the UK,” said OneKind director Harry Huyton.

“It is designed simply to prevent the abhorrent practice of sending live sheep, cows and other animals on long journeys, in inhumane conditions where animals often give birth on lorries, suffer injuries and even die."

On Monday 26 February, MPs will gather in Westminster to discuss and debate banning live animal exports in favour of a carcass-only trade. The debate was triggered after a petition garnered more than 63,000 signatures. 

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ISFM announces first veterinary nurse conference

News Story 1
 The International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) - the veterinary division of International Cat Care - has announced its first annual conference dedicated to veterinary nurses. The day offers an opportunity to meet up with colleagues and enjoy more than five hours of stimulating CPD.

The conference is being held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Stratford-Upon-Avon, on Saturday 15 September 2018. Tickets are £95 per person and include lunch, coffee breaks, downloadable proceedings and CPD certificate. For details and to book your place visit www.eventbrite.co.uk  

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News Shorts
WSAVA awards Australian vet with 'Next Generation’ award

Australian vet Dr Guyan Weerasinghe has been crowned winner of the WSAVA ‘Next Generation’ Veterinary Award. The award recognises those who graduated within the last 10 years and have made a significant contribution to the welfare of companion animals and the veterinary profession as a whole.

Besides maintaining a small animal caseload, Dr Weerasinghe works for the Queensland Government’s Department of Agriculture where he is involved with animal disease surveillance and increasing the public health risks in veterinary practice. He also collaborates on various One Health projects across Australia and gives regular talks on the impact of climate change on animal health and welfare.

Dr Weerasinghe will receive his award at the WSAVA World Congress 2018 (25-28 September).