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Vet school awarded grant for research into AMR
The University of Surrey's School of Veterinary Medicine has been awarded up to €2 million to fund research into antimicrobial resistance.
Grant forms part of a pan-European project between 41 laboratories 

An award worth up to €2 million has been awarded to the University of Surrey’s School of Veterinary Medicine to fund research into emerging infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

The award was granted by the European Commission to help revolutionise veterinary, medical and environmental health research. It forms part of a landmark €90 million pan-European project between 41 acclaimed veterinary and medical laboratories.

The study will see academics from the University of Surrey carry out ground-breaking research into the growing threat of food-borne zoonoses to the population’s health and the rise of AMR.

“Recent zoonotic outbreaks such as avian influenza and the emergence of antibiotic resistance are perfect examples of why this research is urgently required,” explained Professor Roberto La Ragione, head of pathology and infectious diseases at the University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine.
 
“Transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans poses a significant threat to public health across the world and it is important that we act now to avoid its devastating effects.”

Veterinary virology lecturer Dr Dan Horton added:“This programme will create a research community across Europe with medical, veterinary and environmental health scientists working together. Such an interdisciplinary and international approach is essential to address the threats of zoonotic disease and antimicrobial resistance.”

Professor Vince Emery, senior vice-president global strategy and engagement at the University of Surrey said: “This is an excellent example of the substantial value and societal impact associated with being able to access trans-European networks through funding programmes within the EU – something we must seek to protect throughout the Brexit negotiation process”.

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Newborn okapi named after Meghan Markle

News Story 1
 An endangered okapi recently born at London Zoo has been named Meghan - after Prince Harry’s fiancé Meghan Markle - in celebration of the upcoming royal wedding. Okapis are classed as endangered in the wild, having suffered ongoing declines since 1995. Zookeeper Gemma Metcalf said: “We’re very pleased with how mother and baby are doing. Oni is being very attentive, making sure she regularly licks her clean and keeping a watchful eye over Meghan as she sleeps.” Image © ZSL London Zoo  

News Shorts
Ten new cases of Alabama rot confirmed

Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists has confirmed 10 new cases of Alabama rot, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the UK to 122.

In a Facebook post, the referral centre said the cases were from County Durham, West Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, Sussex, West Somerset, Devon, and Powys.

Pet owners are urged to remain vigilant and seek advice from their vet if their dog develops unexplained skin lesions/sores.