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Vet school awarded grant for research into AMR
The University of Surrey's School of Veterinary Medicine has been awarded up to €2 million to fund research into antimicrobial resistance.
Grant forms part of a pan-European project between 41 laboratories 

An award worth up to €2 million has been awarded to the University of Surrey’s School of Veterinary Medicine to fund research into emerging infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

The award was granted by the European Commission to help revolutionise veterinary, medical and environmental health research. It forms part of a landmark €90 million pan-European project between 41 acclaimed veterinary and medical laboratories.

The study will see academics from the University of Surrey carry out ground-breaking research into the growing threat of food-borne zoonoses to the population’s health and the rise of AMR.

“Recent zoonotic outbreaks such as avian influenza and the emergence of antibiotic resistance are perfect examples of why this research is urgently required,” explained Professor Roberto La Ragione, head of pathology and infectious diseases at the University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine.
 
“Transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans poses a significant threat to public health across the world and it is important that we act now to avoid its devastating effects.”

Veterinary virology lecturer Dr Dan Horton added:“This programme will create a research community across Europe with medical, veterinary and environmental health scientists working together. Such an interdisciplinary and international approach is essential to address the threats of zoonotic disease and antimicrobial resistance.”

Professor Vince Emery, senior vice-president global strategy and engagement at the University of Surrey said: “This is an excellent example of the substantial value and societal impact associated with being able to access trans-European networks through funding programmes within the EU – something we must seek to protect throughout the Brexit negotiation process”.

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Nominations for 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards now open

News Story 1
 People across the UK are being urged to nominate a standout animal champion for the 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards.

The awards recognise those who have worked tirelessly to improve animal welfare, campaigned on behalf of animals, or shown true bravery. Previous winners include comedian John Bishop, who was awarded Celebrity Animal Champion of the Year, and 11-year-old Lobby Cantwell, who raised more than £1,000 for the charity through mountain climbs and bike rides.

To submit a nomination or find out more about the awards visit the RSPCA website. Nominations will remain open until 4 pm on Friday, March 15.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New £1m project to investigate dairy cow lameness

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) is leading a new £1 million research project to investigate the causes of lameness in dairy cows.

One in three dairy cows are affected by lameness every day in the UK, costing the industry an estimated £250 milion annually.

The project will take three years to complete and is due to finish by November 2021.

Professor Georgios Banos of SRUC commented: “In addition to pain and discomfort to the animal, lameness is associated with decreased milk production and inflated farm costs.

“Among cows raised in the same environment, some become lame while others do not. Understanding the reasons behind this will help us develop targeted preventive practices contributing to enhanced animal welfare and farm profitability.”