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Vet school awarded grant for research into AMR
The University of Surrey's School of Veterinary Medicine has been awarded up to €2 million to fund research into antimicrobial resistance.
Grant forms part of a pan-European project between 41 laboratories 

An award worth up to €2 million has been awarded to the University of Surrey’s School of Veterinary Medicine to fund research into emerging infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

The award was granted by the European Commission to help revolutionise veterinary, medical and environmental health research. It forms part of a landmark €90 million pan-European project between 41 acclaimed veterinary and medical laboratories.

The study will see academics from the University of Surrey carry out ground-breaking research into the growing threat of food-borne zoonoses to the population’s health and the rise of AMR.

“Recent zoonotic outbreaks such as avian influenza and the emergence of antibiotic resistance are perfect examples of why this research is urgently required,” explained Professor Roberto La Ragione, head of pathology and infectious diseases at the University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine.
 
“Transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans poses a significant threat to public health across the world and it is important that we act now to avoid its devastating effects.”

Veterinary virology lecturer Dr Dan Horton added:“This programme will create a research community across Europe with medical, veterinary and environmental health scientists working together. Such an interdisciplinary and international approach is essential to address the threats of zoonotic disease and antimicrobial resistance.”

Professor Vince Emery, senior vice-president global strategy and engagement at the University of Surrey said: “This is an excellent example of the substantial value and societal impact associated with being able to access trans-European networks through funding programmes within the EU – something we must seek to protect throughout the Brexit negotiation process”.

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Vets save premature penguin chick

News Story 1
 Vets have saved a tiny Humboldt penguin chick after her egg was accidentally broken by her parents. Keepers at ZSL London Zoo were shocked to find the chick, named Rainbow, still alive and rushed her straight to the Zoo’s on-site veterinary clinic.

It was a little way to go until the chick should have hatched, so the process was touch and go. Vets removed bits of shell from around the chick with tweezers until she could be lifted out and placed in a makeshift nest.

Rainbow is now in a custom-built incubation room where she spends her days cuddled up to a toy penguin. Keepers will hand-fed Rainbow for the next 10 weeks until she is healthy enough to move to the penguin nursery.  

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BVA infographic to help shoppers understand farm assurance schemes

An infographic to help members of the public understand farm assurance schemes has been produced by the BVA. The infographic outlines BVA’s priorities for animal welfare and shows whether or not the schemes address these priorities in their standards.

BVA president John Fishwick said: “The infographic is not intended to be a league table but to allow people to understand what aspects of animal health and welfare are addressed by assurance schemes so that they can decide which scheme best aligns with their own individual preferences and priorities."