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Vet school awarded grant for research into AMR
The University of Surrey's School of Veterinary Medicine has been awarded up to €2 million to fund research into antimicrobial resistance.
Grant forms part of a pan-European project between 41 laboratories 

An award worth up to €2 million has been awarded to the University of Surrey’s School of Veterinary Medicine to fund research into emerging infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

The award was granted by the European Commission to help revolutionise veterinary, medical and environmental health research. It forms part of a landmark €90 million pan-European project between 41 acclaimed veterinary and medical laboratories.

The study will see academics from the University of Surrey carry out ground-breaking research into the growing threat of food-borne zoonoses to the population’s health and the rise of AMR.

“Recent zoonotic outbreaks such as avian influenza and the emergence of antibiotic resistance are perfect examples of why this research is urgently required,” explained Professor Roberto La Ragione, head of pathology and infectious diseases at the University of Surrey School of Veterinary Medicine.
 
“Transmission of infectious diseases from animals to humans poses a significant threat to public health across the world and it is important that we act now to avoid its devastating effects.”

Veterinary virology lecturer Dr Dan Horton added:“This programme will create a research community across Europe with medical, veterinary and environmental health scientists working together. Such an interdisciplinary and international approach is essential to address the threats of zoonotic disease and antimicrobial resistance.”

Professor Vince Emery, senior vice-president global strategy and engagement at the University of Surrey said: “This is an excellent example of the substantial value and societal impact associated with being able to access trans-European networks through funding programmes within the EU – something we must seek to protect throughout the Brexit negotiation process”.

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New app to improve street dog welfare

News Story 1
 A new free app will support vital work in clinics caring for stray dogs around the world, experts say. Created by the University of Edinburgh, the tool allows vets to track the wellbeing of dogs going through catch-neuter-return schemes, which are common in countries with large numbers of strays.

Vets say the welfare of individual dogs can be overlooked during the process of capture, transport or surgery. The app, piloted across Asia and Africa, helps staff to monitor welfare, spot signs of distress and develop strategies to improve care. It was launched at BSAVA Congress on Friday 6 April.  

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Farm to fork traceability championed in new service

Defra has created a new information service to offer farm to fork traceability when the UK leaves the EU. The Livestock Information Service, which is set to be operational from 2019, will identify and track animal movements via electronic IDs, meaning the industry and government are better placed to respond in the event of a disease outbreak.

Environment secretary Michael Gove said: “This service will be instrumental in improving traceability and providing guarantees to consumers about the origin of their food. NFU President Minette Batters, among others, has helped lead the way on this, showing how it will drive a progressive and vibrant livestock industry once we leave the EU.”