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FEI Tribunal lifts 11 provisional suspensions
Jockeys
Banned substances should never be found in the body of the horse.

Horses previously tested for banned substances

Provisional suspensions being served by 11 equine athletes - including two show jumping, two dressage, seven endurance and three endurance trainers - have been lifted by the FEI Tribunal.

The two show jumping athletes, Brazil’s Marlon Modolo Zanotelli and Great Britain’s Henry Turrell, both had their provisional suspensions lifted as of midnight on 27 April.
Their horses both tested positive for the banned substance Sparteine after competing at separate events last month.

The FEI Tribunal says that its decision to lift the provisional suspensions was mainly based on scientific evidence presented by the two athletes which suggests the likelihood of food contamination.

The provisional suspensions imposed on the endurance athletes and trainers were lifted at midnight on 30 April, due to the reclassification of a banned substance. Their horses tested positive for caffeine and a number of metabolites whilst completing at various events in Al Wathba earlier this year.

In a separate case, two dressage athletes - Adrienne Lyle and Kaitlin Blythe - had been provisionally suspended since 5 April. Their horses tested positive to the banned substance Ractopamine whilst competing in Dressage competitions in Wellington (USA) in February.
 
Their provisional suspensions were lifted at midnight on 28 April following evidence provided by the two athletes that a feed supplement given to the horses had been contaminated.

The FEI’s Prohibited Substances List is divided into two sections - Controlled Medication and Banned Substances. Controlled Medication substances are those that are used regularly to treat horses, but which must have been cleared from the horse’s system by the time of competition. Banned substances should never be found in the body of the horse.
 
In the case of an adverse analytical finding for a Banned Substance, the Person Responsible is automatically provisionally suspended from the date of notification. The horse is suspended for two months.

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Endangered turtle born at London Zoo

News Story 1
 An endangered spiny hill turtle has become the first of its kind to hatch at ZSL London Zoo - just in time for World Turtle Day (23 May).

Zookeepers filmed the moment the turtle came out of its shell on a time lapse camera, after keeping a watchful eye on the egg during its 136 day incubation period.

The turtle weighed a tiny 33g at birth and measured just 61mm, although it will eventually grow to around 27cm in size. 

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Melissa Donald elected president of BVA Scottish Branch

RCVS Council member Melissa Donald has been elected for a two-year term as president of BVA’s Scottish Branch. She said she was “honoured” to be elected and hopes to provide a strong voice for veterinary surgeons, particularly at a national level. One of her first tasks will be to give evidence to the Scottish government on tail shortening of dogs, before parliament votes on whether to change the current legislation.

Melissa graduated from Glasgow veterinary school and worked as a production animal vet at Iowa State University, USA, for three years, before returning to Ayrshire to work in mixed practice. She then spent 25 years developing a small animal practice with her husband and has been involved with the BVA for many years. Recently, she took the decision to step back from clinical practice and currently runs a smallholding in the Ayrshire Hills.