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Hiring vets from abroad
Dr Sainz-Pardo shared his views about Brexit and what it might mean for the future of the veterinary profession.

Delegates learn how Brexit might influence employment

“The future of the profession lies in mastering methods that ensure staff retention and their development," said Dr Luis Sainz-Pardo, speaking this morning (28 January) at VPMA and SPVS Congress in Newport. "We have plenty of vets, what we need to do is stop losing them."

Dr Sainz-Pardo is the managing director of Vet Abroad, a mentoring and advisory service that helps overseas vets prepare for UK employment. During the session, he shared his views about Brexit and what it might mean for the future of the veterinary profession.

Speaking to delegates, Dr Sainz-Pardo said that it is challenges such as Brexit that make us reflect and help us to appreciate what we could be losing. "I think all challenges or changes lead to better things," he said. "I think it's going to bring the profession really close."

Dr Sainz Pardo believes that, with Brexit, we are going to see fewer overseas vets entering the profession. Indeed, research already shows that there has been a drop in new registrations and applications to UK universities.

"People don't go where they are not wanted or welcome - and there are other countries with a lot of employment that are welcoming people," he said. "The only solution to this problem is to retain people in the profession and to make them useful to us."

During the session, Dr Sainz-Pardo looked at the benefits and pitfalls of hiring vets from abroad and called on practice managers to review their mentoring schemes.

A series of testimonials revealed that many vets who come to work in the UK fear not knowing what steps to take. However, with the help of their mentors, they were able to overcome their fears and understand what their clients expected of them.

"From my experience I can certainly say that mentoring is the key to a successful professional relationship between a foreign vet and their UK employer," said one participant.

Dr Sainz-Pardo has over 20 years experience as an employee, employer and practice owner in the UK.

Vet Abroad was one of the first organisations in the UK to receive the BSAVA Standard and was later given Tier 2 accreditation by the RCVS. 

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Mission Rabies 2017 off to a great start

News Story 1
 More than 4,500 dogs have been vaccinated against rabies in one of the first major drives of 2017.

It took just two weeks in January for Mission Rabies to vaccinate 4,575 dogs in the Meru district of Tanzania.

The team set-up vaccination points across the district and followed-up with door-to-door work, checking vaccination cards and giving vaccines to any dogs that had been missed.

Overall, the charity reached 75 per cent of the local dog population, smashing last year's total and comfortably above the required 70 per cent.  

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US science association honours leading Pirbright scientist

A leading scientist at The Pirbright Institute has been honoured by the American Association for the Advancement of Science as a 2017-2018 AAAS Alan I. Leshner Leadership Institute Public Engagement Fellow.

Dr Anthony Wilson, group leader for integrative entomology at Pirbright, was chosen from a large number of international applicants, together with 14 other infectious disease researchers from around the world.

In selecting the new Public Engagement Fellows, the AAAS said they had demonstrated, "...leadership and excellence in their research careers and interest in promoting meaningful dialogue between science and society".