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Mercury poses a rising threat to Arctic birds
ivory gull
Concentrations of mercury in ivory gull feathers increased nearly 50-fold in 130 years.

Contaminant may be the cause of ivory gull declines

Rising exposure to mercury could be the cause of rapid declines in Arctic bird populations, particularly ivory gulls, according to new research.

Ivory gull populations have fallen by more than 80 per cent in Canada since the 1980s, leaving just 400-500 breeding pairs. However, the reasons for this are not well understood.

Biologists from Canada's University of Saskatchewan aimed to find out whether contaminants are to blame by analysing the burden of methyl mercury in feathers over the past 130 years.

Using feathers from museum specimens spanning 1877-2007, researchers found concentrations of mercury had increased nearly 50-fold, despite no evidence of dietary change during this period.

Writing in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B- Biological Sciences, the authors say: "Methyl mercury (MeHG) in ivory gull feathers increased significantly over the past 130 years, despite the lack of evidence of a shift in diet.

"We attribute this increase to increases in the amount of mercury (HG) in the environment that has been observed post-industrially and attributed to human activity."

With oceanic mercury expected to rise four-fold between 2005-2050, the findings have prompted concerns about continued dramatic declines in ivory gull  populations, as well as other high-latitude species.

For the full report, visit: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/282/1805/20150032

Image © jomilo75/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 2.0

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COVID-19 resources for veterinary professionals

News Story 1
 RCVS Knowledge, the charity partner of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS), has published a page of COVID-19 coronavirus resources for veterinary professionals across the industry.

The resource, which can be found here, includes veterinary advice, updates, research and evidence regarding the virus. The advice encompasses information to help veterinary professionals respond to questions from their clients and the BCVA's latest guidance for farm animal vets.

Veterinary professionals are urged to share the resource on social media and let RCVS Knowledge know of any additions. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BVA senior vice president appointed chair of FVE working group

Senior vice president of the BVA Dr Simon Doherty has been appointed as chair of the Food Safety & Sustainability working group of the Federation of Veterinarians in Europe (FVE).

Dr Doherty has 20 years' experience in farm animal and equine veterinary practice, industry and academia. He has been working as a senior lecturer at the Queen's University Belfast Institute for Global Food Security since 2018 and is a trustee of Send a Cow and the Animal Welfare Foundation.

The Food Safety & Sustainability working group will support FVE in all matters related to food safety, food security and sustainable livestock systems. It will also assist FVE in taking the most effective policies at EU level.