Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Dogs at risk from snakebites, warns PDSA
Cookie
Cookie's face swelled within minutes of being bitten.

Recent prolonged sunny spells could mean that snakebites are more common

The PDSA is urging dog owners to beware of snakes in woods and grassland after saving the life of greyhound Cookie, who was bitten on Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. The eight-year-old dog is now recovering after a near-fatal encounter with an adder at the popular beauty spot.

Owner Lynn Pallatina said: "I didn't know what had happened to Cookie at first, she was sniffing around and then jumped back suddenly.
I saw the end of a snake but I didn’t think she’d actually been bitten – I thought they tended to stay away from people and other animals.  But then she just lay down on the ground, opening and closing her mouth and within three minutes her face had started to swell badly so I knew something was wrong. I took her straight to PDSA and they asked if it was possible Cookie had been bitten by something, it was only then that it clicked it may have been the adder.”

Kay Brough, head nurse at Wolverhampton PDSA said:  "Adder bites to dogs are thankfully quite rare but when seen they are usually on the face or limbs, most likely as a result of the snake attacking in self-defence after being disturbed by an inquisitive dogs.

"The venom causes severe, rapid swelling and two small puncture wounds may be visible at the centre. The dog can also show signs of acute pain and may appear nervous or apprehensive. If not treated it can cause them to collapse and can even be fatal. Any owner noticing these symptoms should call their vet immediately for advice. Do not touch the wound, as this can spread the venom further."

She goes on to advise that if you do see an adder, do not try to approach it or photograph it. "The venom is toxic to humans too, although it isn't usually fatal due to our larger size. Keep your distance and put your dog on a lead immediately."

PDSA is the UK's leading veterinary charity, providing free treatment for the sick and injured pets of eligible owners in need. The charity receives no government or national lottery funding for its PetAid services, relying entirely on generous public support. For more information visit www.pdsa.org.uk.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Veterinary Evidence Student Awards winners revealed

News Story 1
 The first winners of the RCVS Knowledge Veterinary Evidence Student Awards have been revealed.

Molly Vasanthakumar scooped first prize for her knowledge summary comparing the ecological impact of woven versus disposable drapes. She found that there is not enough evidence that disposable synthetics reduce the risk of surgical site.

Second prize went to Honoria Brown of the University of Cambridge, for her paper: ‘Can hoof wall temperature and digital pulse pressure be used as sensitive non-invasive diagnostic indicators of acute laminitis onset?’

Edinburgh’s Jacqueline Oi Ping Tong won third prize for critically appraising the evidence for whether a daily probiotic improved clinical outcomes in dogs with idiopathic diarrhoea. The papers have all achieved publication in RCVS Knowledge’s peer-reviewed journal, Veterinary Evidence.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Animal Welfare Foundation seeks new trustees

The Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF) seeks three new trustees to help drive the charity’s mission to improve animal welfare through veterinary science, education and debate.

Veterinary and animal welfare professionals from across the UK may apply, particularly those with experience in equine and small animal practice and research management. Trustees must attend at least two meetings a year, as well as the annual AWF Discussion Forum in London.

For more information about the role, visit www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk. Applications close at midnight on 13 August 2019.