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Endangered turtles rescued from smugglers

A group of endangered turtles have found a new home at London Zoo after being rescued from smugglers.

The four big-headed turtles arrived at the zoo at the end of last year, after smugglers tried to illegally import them to Canada, labelled as toys.

One of the turtles, named Lady Triệu after a Vietnamese warrioress, has moved to a new exhibit in the zoo’s reptile house. She is the only one of her kind in a UK zoo. 

Big-headed turtles have such large heads that they cannot pull them back into their shells. To compensate, they have armour plating from head to tail and a very sharp beak to fend off predators. They are ranked number 18 on ZSL’s EDGE of Existence reptile list, which puts threatened species at the forefront of conservation action.

Images © ZSL 

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Petplan Veterinary Awards 2020 open for nominations

News Story 1
 Nominations are open for the 2020 Petplan Veterinary Awards, a prestigious event that pays recognition to some of the UKs most notable veterinary professionals.

We have been recognising the brilliant work of the UKs veterinary professionals through the Petplan Veterinary Awards for 21 years now and every year the standard of entries just gets higher, said James Barnes, head of sales and partnerships at Petplan.

To nominate a colleague for the awards visit petplanvet.co.uk/vetawards, before nominations close on 16th January 2020. Winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on 2 April 2020 in Birmingham. 

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News Shorts
BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.