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Vets and medics join forces to remove horse’s sinus tumour
“We were able to remove a substantial portion of the tumor in order to open the sinus cavity and take any pressure off Honesto’s eye socket and brain." (Stock image)
Image-guided techniques allowed safe tumour removal 

Equine vets have teamed up with a human doctor to carry out the first image-guided removal of a sinus tumour in a horse.

Six-year-old horse Honesto had a massive sinus osteoma. Radiographs and a CT scan taken by the UC Davis veterinary hospital in California showed the mass was encroaching on his eye socket and blocking the right nasal cavity and numerous sinuses, including the frontal sinus directly in front of the brain.

Surgery was required to prevent the tumour growing and causing injury to the eye and brain. However, the usual method is to make a large incision in the area to burr and chisel the tumour away. Using this technique, there is no way for surgeons to determine how close they are to critical areas such as the eye and brain.

Deciding how to proceed, Honesto’s owner Angela Langen discussed the case with her close friend George Domb, who is an ear, nose and throat doctor. He suggested a method used in human medicine, which uses an image-guided navigation system so that surgeons can operate on the tumour whilst identifying the precise position of their instruments on a CT scan.

Dr Domb worked with Dr Larry Galuppo, chief of the equine surgery and lameness service at UC Davis, to undertake the procedure.

Honesto recovered well from the anaesthesia and returned home two days after surgery. At his one-week check up, Dr Galuppo noted significant progress and removed his sinus irrigation tube. After another week, Honesto’s skin staples were removed.

“We were pleased to see that the procedure worked well,” said Dr Galuppo. “We were able to remove a substantial portion of the tumor in order to open the sinus cavity and take any pressure off Honesto’s eye socket and brain. He’s one tough horse.”

Dr Domb added: “This was the first time I’ve ever seen surgery on a horse, much less participated. It was amazing how the anesthesia team took care of Honesto, and collaborating with the entire veterinary team at UC Davis was a wonderful experience. Dr. Galuppo and everyone on the equine surgery team made the whole procedure flawless.

The team plan to have further discussions about utilising human sinus treatments in veterinary medicine.

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New road sign to protect small wildlife

News Story 1
 Transport secretary Chris Grayling has unveiled a new road sign to help cut traffic accidents and protect small wildlife, particularly hedgehogs.

Local authorities and animal welfare groups are being asked to identify accident and wildlife hotspots where the sign - which features a hedgehog - should be located.

Government figures show that more than 600 people were injured in road accidents involving animals in 2017, and four people were killed. These figures do not include accidents involving horses. The new sign will be used to warn motorists in areas where there are large concentrations of small wild animals, including squirrels, badgers, otters and hedgehogs.  

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News Shorts
NOAH members re-elect Jamie Brannan as chair

Jamie Brannan, senior Vice President of Zoetis, has been re-elected as chair of NOAH for 2019/20, during this year’s AGM, held in London.

Mr Brannan joined Zoetis and the NOAH board in 2016, becoming NOAH’s vice-chair in 2018 and replacing Gaynor Hillier as chair later that year.

He commented: “I am extremely pleased to have been elected by the NOAH membership and am proud to be able to represent our industry at such a critical time for the UK animal health industry. I look forward to driving forward our new NOAH Strategy and to working with our members, old and new, in the coming year.”