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Nurses take part in beach clean for VNAM
"Litter, especially plastics and fishing gear, can cause devastating and often life-threatening problems for our wildlife and eco system."

Plastic drinks caps among the most common rubbish items

Veterinary nurses took part in the first beach clean for Veterinary Nursing Awareness Month (VNAM) this year, clearing 27 bags of rubbish from Old Hunstanton Beach in Norfolk.

The beach clean, attended by over 40 people, was organised by BVNA Council member Jo Hinde and RVN Diane Westwood-Rowland.

“Veterinary nurses are often giving their very little spare time to causes that improve welfare for both humans and animals,” Jo Hinde said. “Beach cleans are a great example of this. Litter, especially plastics and fishing gear, can cause devastating and often life-threatening problems for our wildlife and eco system.

She added: “It was super to have the support of nurses and the general public on the day and help raise awareness of this problem as well as highlight some of the amazing things that veterinary nurses do.”

The most common waste items found during the beach clean were plastic caps from bottled drinks, cotton ear bud sticks and baby wipes. Other frequently found items were fishing netting, rope and monofilament lines, which can all be deadly to many animals.

Diane Westwood Rowland said: “The importance of the beach clean was highlighted when we sadly found two deceased animals, a seal and a gannet. We do not know what killed these beautiful creatures, but it reinforces the fact that humans need to wake up to the damage they are causing.”

There are plans to include the clean up in future VNAM campaigns and expand it to beaches across the UK.

Image © Jo Hinde
 

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New road sign to protect small wildlife

News Story 1
 Transport secretary Chris Grayling has unveiled a new road sign to help cut traffic accidents and protect small wildlife, particularly hedgehogs.

Local authorities and animal welfare groups are being asked to identify accident and wildlife hotspots where the sign - which features a hedgehog - should be located.

Government figures show that more than 600 people were injured in road accidents involving animals in 2017, and four people were killed. These figures do not include accidents involving horses. The new sign will be used to warn motorists in areas where there are large concentrations of small wild animals, including squirrels, badgers, otters and hedgehogs.  

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News Shorts
NOAH members re-elect Jamie Brannan as chair

Jamie Brannan, senior Vice President of Zoetis, has been re-elected as chair of NOAH for 2019/20, during this year’s AGM, held in London.

Mr Brannan joined Zoetis and the NOAH board in 2016, becoming NOAH’s vice-chair in 2018 and replacing Gaynor Hillier as chair later that year.

He commented: “I am extremely pleased to have been elected by the NOAH membership and am proud to be able to represent our industry at such a critical time for the UK animal health industry. I look forward to driving forward our new NOAH Strategy and to working with our members, old and new, in the coming year.”