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Wildcat population ‘no longer viable’ in Scotland
Hybridisation, where wildcats breed with feral or domestic cats, is a major threat to the species.

Cat owners ‘have an important role’ in reversing declines

There is no longer a viable wildcat population living in Scotland, according to a review of the evidence by members of the IUCN.

Previous studies have shown that hybridisation - where wildcats breed with feral or domestic cats - is a major threat to the species. Limited food sources and persecution are thought to have prompted the few remaining wildcats to breed with domestic cats.

Steps are now underway to bring the species back from the brink, including a potential release programme of captive-bred animals and a National Wildlife Reintroduction Centre.

Scottish Natural Heritage said a national conversation is needed on how to manage domestic and feral cat populations.

“The public will have an important role in helping minimise future hybridisation,” said head of policy and advice, Eileen Stuart. “Responsible cat ownership - including microchipping, neutering and vaccinations - is one way we can help reduce the devastating effects on wildcats.”

Dr Andrew Kitchener, steering group chair for Scottish Wildcat Action (SWA), added: “We now have the strongest and most reliable evidence to date that wildcats are in a more endangered state than previously understood.

“While we believe there are wildcats remaining in the wild in Scotland, there are no longer enough to ensure their continued survival as viable populations. We can now plan the essential next steps to give the wildcat a sustainable future.”

SWA’s project partner, the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, is working with a range of organisations on a series of measures to reverse the declines.

Scottish cabinet secretary Roseanna Cunningham said she will “consider every possible action the Scottish Government can take to save [the species]”.

Image by Peter Trimming/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY 2.0
 

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Huge spike in ‘designer’ dogs going into rescue

News Story 1
 The RSPCA has reported a huge spike in the number of ‘designer’ dogs arriving into its care.

Figures published by the charity show there has been a 517 per cent increase in the number of French bulldogs arriving into its kennels. During that time, the charity has also seen an increase in dachshunds, chihuahuas, and crossbreeds.

RSPCA dog welfare expert Lisa Hens said: “We know that the breeds of dog coming into our care often reflect the trends in dog ownership in the wider world and, at the moment, it doesn’t get more trendy than ‘designer’ dogs like French bulldogs and Dachshunds."

 

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Withdrawal period increased for Closamectin pour-on

The withdrawal period for Closamectin pour-on solution for cattle has been increased from 28 days to 58 for meat and offal.

Closamectin treats roundworms, late immature to adult fluke (from seven weeks), mange mites and lice.

Norbrook Laboratories Ltd said the change would take effect immediately. Customers are being offered practical support to inform end users.

The change meets industry requirements to reduce the amount of residue going into food and the environment. It has been approved by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate and an updated summary of product characteristics will be available on the website.