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Publication to help mitigate the spread of equine disease
"The welfare of our equines and mitigating the risk of transmission is a team effort" - Celia Marr, EIDAG.
Guidance provides practical advice for those organising equine activities. 

New guidance aimed at reducing the risk of equine disease transmission has been published by British Equestrian’s Equine Infectious Disease Action Group (EIDAG).

The document, entitled Advice notes for BEF member bodies and organisers of horse gatherings, provides practical advice so those in the equine industry who oversee and organise equine activities can put effective and practical measures, guidance and education in place.

It is the result of months of input from the EIDAG, and is based on ten pillars of equine infectious disease management that organisers should follow, including:
  • responsibility
  • raising standards and education
  • risk communication and responsiveness
  • vaccination
  • vigilance and risk reduction
  • biosecurity practice: participants
  • biosecurity practice: stabling
  • early disease recognition
  • transparent information sharing
  • support national infectious disease management.
Based on compliance and measures in place, gatherings can then operate at gold, silver or bronze standard to illustrate the level of biosecurity in place to those looking to enter or take part.

The advice notes also contain general background information on a number of endemic and exotic diseases present in Great Britain to help educate horse owners on signs and management.

“Infectious Disease is with us all time, but the welfare of our equines and mitigating the risk of transmission is a team effort. Responsibility lies with all of us in the equine community to work together and play a part,” commented Celia Marr, chair of the EIDAG.

“The recent EHV outbreak in Europe clearly demonstrated what is possible with a collaborative approach between horse owners, member bodies, veterinary practitioners, industry advisers and organisers. We managed the situation promptly so there were no linked cases on home soil, but without us working together, the situation could have been much worse.

“We hope the guidance notes are the catalyst for instilling the principles of biosecurity and their importance for all who interact with equines, be they grassroots or professionals. Getting the key messages across, education and practical advice is crucial to reducing transmission risk and keeping disease in our equine population in check.”

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RCVS Fellowship applications open

News Story 1
 Applications have now opened for RCVS Fellowship 2022. The RCVS is encouraging anyone who would like to be considered for Fellowship to apply, and if successful, they will be welcomed into the Fellowship next year.

The process for joining the fellowship has changed slightly for this year, as applicants will now need two signed referee forms instead of three professional references, and five assessors will review each application instead of three.

The deadline for applications is 14 February 2022, and more information on how to apply can be found here. If applicants have any questions, or would like informal advice from previous successful applicants, they are encouraged to contact Ceri Via Email 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Horiba announces veterinary haematology webinar

Horiba Medical has announced a free webinar providing practical insight on best practice in veterinary haematology. Entitled 'In practice haematology - Beyond the pale!' the webinar will be presented by Ronnie Barron from the University of Glasgow Veterinary School.

Ronnie's presentation, which will conclude with a Q&A session, will look at QC and artefacts of sample quality and review the effects of different pathologies. Using images, photomicrographs and video links, he will also explain the techniques and equipment needed to complement analytical automation to confirm results quality.

The webinar takes place on Thursday, October 28 (7.30-9pm). For more details and to register, click here.