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BEVA asks horse owners to return unused antibiotics
Antimicriobial Awareness Week is running from 18-24 November.
The association has urged everyone to play their part to tackle resistance.

With Antimicrobial Awareness Week (18-24 November 2023) set to begin, the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is asking horse owners not to hoard unused antibiotics.

The organisation has reminded owners that irresponsible antibiotic use can lead to resistance developing, making antibiotics less effective.

BEVA’s past president David Rendle said: “Giving random, left over or old antibiotics to your horse for a suspected infection is irresponsible and potentially dangerous.

“It could make things worse, as they might not be the right type of antibiotic for that specific infection and could easily contribute to the problem of resistance. People also forget that antibiotics are not without risk and their use can trigger serious – even fatal – intestinal disease.”

Instead of stockpiling old medicines, BEVA is advising horse owners to return any unused antibiotics to their veterinary practice.

BEVA president Roger Smith added: “It is crucial not to throw old medicines away in the rubbish or flush them down the loo, as they can eventually return to the environment, contaminating soil and watercourses and cause damage to wildlife.

“The problems we are seeing with antimicrobial resistance is relevant to all vets and all horse owners, and we must all act to reduce the development of resistance.”

BEVA provides a ‘Protect Me Toolkit' for members, which contains posters and fact sheets about responsible antimicrobial use to share with clients.

Image © Shutterstock

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RCVS Knowledge appoints Veterinary Evidence editor-in-chief

News Story 1
 RCVS Knowledge has welcomed Professor Peter Cockcroft as editor-in-chief for Veterinary Evidence.

A world-renowned expert in evidence-based veterinary medicine, Prof Cockcroft will lead the strategic development and editorial quality of the open-access journal. He was previously in the role from 2017-2020.

Katie Mantell, CEO of RCVS Knowledge, said: "We are excited about the extensive knowledge of evidence-based veterinary medicine and clinical veterinary research that Peter brings, and we look forward to working with him over this next phase of the journal's development." 

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News Shorts
Defra to host bluetongue webinar for vets

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) will be hosting a webinar for veterinary professional on bluetongue on Thursday, 25 April 2024.

Topics covered will include the transmission cycle, pathology and pathogenesis, clinical signs (including signs seen in recent BTV-3 cases in the Netherlands), and control and prevention.

The session, which will take place from 6pm to 7.30pm, is part of Defra's 'Plan, Prevent and Protect' webinar series, which are hosted by policy officials, epidemiologists and veterinary professionals from Defra and the Animal and Plant Health Agency. The bluetongue session will also feature insights from experts from The Pirbright Institute.

Those attending will have the opportunity to ask questions. Places on the webinar can be booked online.