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Caprine arthritis encephalitis confirmed in Northern Ireland
“This is the first-ever confirmation of the CAE virus in NI, other than those recorded at post-import checks".

DAERA reports first-ever confirmed case of the disease in the country

Northern Ireland’s (NI) chief veterinary officer Dr Robert Huey has called for vigilance after officials confirmed the first case of caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAP) goat disease in the country.

On Thursday (21 November) NI’s Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA), confirmed the disease in a goat on a holding in County Londonderry. CAE is a lentivirus closely related to Maedi Visna virus in sheep and is notifiable in NI. 


“This is the first-ever confirmation of the CAE virus in NI, other than those recorded at post-import checks,” explained Dr Huey. “The virus is found worldwide, but until this detection, the disease has never been recorded on the island of Ireland.”


An initial assessment of the infected goat, which had been imported from Great Britain (GB) concluded that the most likely source of infection was at the herd of origin in GB. The animals on the premises were slaughtered under DAERA supervision and movements are being restricted.

Dr Huey said that keeping the disease out of Northern Ireland is vital for animal health and urged farmers to carry out effective biosecurity measures.


“Keeping NI free from animal diseases, in so far as possible, is vital to maintain our high standards of animal health and underpin the trading status of NI agri-food,” Dr Huey added.

“While CAE certainly adversely affects the health of goats due to pain and disability, the presence of this disease could potentially have serious economic implications. The economic impact of CAE includes reduced productivity, early culling, paralysis and death in kids, gradual drop in milk yield due to mastitis and potential damage to export sales.”

He continued: “It is essential that we continue to take the necessary steps to protect our animals, industry, international trade and the wider economy. I would strongly encourage farmers to follow DAERA guidance on responsible sourcing of animals and to be aware of the significant risks and the potentially adverse consequences, both for themselves and for the industry of a disease incursion.”


Clinical signs of CAE include arthritis in the older animal and a lowered mid yield owing to mastitis. Most goats contract the disease at a young age and continue to test positive for life. Transmission is primarily by milk or colostrum.


Other clinical signs include poor coat conditions, hard udder syndrome, paralysis in kids’ legs and hair loss. 

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VetCT app offered to students and new graduates

News Story 1
 The VetCT app is being offered for free to students and new veterinary graduates for their first three months in practice. The app provides a service for vets to send case information to a global team of Diploma-holding specialists, who can provide advice and support via instant call-back, text chat, written report, or virtual appointment.

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The app is downloadable for both iOS and Android systems. 

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HORIBA to host CPD webinar

HORIBA has announced that it will host an online CPD meeting focusing on 'Exotic Parasites - The Importance of Testing in The Imported Dog'. Ian Wright (BVMS, MSc, MRCVS), head of ESCCAP UK and Ireland, will present on the importance of testing protocols in diseases of imported dogs.

The meeting will provide attendees with an overview of emerging veterinary diseases with a particular focus on exotic parasites, and discuss the importance of accurate testing protocols and equipment, alongside a final Q&A session.

The webinar will take place on Thursday July 1, from 19.30pm to 21.00pm BST. For free registration and more information visit the Horiba website or register.gotowebinar.com