Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Caprine arthritis encephalitis confirmed in Northern Ireland
“This is the first-ever confirmation of the CAE virus in NI, other than those recorded at post-import checks".

DAERA reports first-ever confirmed case of the disease in the country

Northern Ireland’s (NI) chief veterinary officer Dr Robert Huey has called for vigilance after officials confirmed the first case of caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAP) goat disease in the country.

On Thursday (21 November) NI’s Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA), confirmed the disease in a goat on a holding in County Londonderry. CAE is a lentivirus closely related to Maedi Visna virus in sheep and is notifiable in NI. 


“This is the first-ever confirmation of the CAE virus in NI, other than those recorded at post-import checks,” explained Dr Huey. “The virus is found worldwide, but until this detection, the disease has never been recorded on the island of Ireland.”


An initial assessment of the infected goat, which had been imported from Great Britain (GB) concluded that the most likely source of infection was at the herd of origin in GB. The animals on the premises were slaughtered under DAERA supervision and movements are being restricted.

Dr Huey said that keeping the disease out of Northern Ireland is vital for animal health and urged farmers to carry out effective biosecurity measures.


“Keeping NI free from animal diseases, in so far as possible, is vital to maintain our high standards of animal health and underpin the trading status of NI agri-food,” Dr Huey added.

“While CAE certainly adversely affects the health of goats due to pain and disability, the presence of this disease could potentially have serious economic implications. The economic impact of CAE includes reduced productivity, early culling, paralysis and death in kids, gradual drop in milk yield due to mastitis and potential damage to export sales.”

He continued: “It is essential that we continue to take the necessary steps to protect our animals, industry, international trade and the wider economy. I would strongly encourage farmers to follow DAERA guidance on responsible sourcing of animals and to be aware of the significant risks and the potentially adverse consequences, both for themselves and for the industry of a disease incursion.”


Clinical signs of CAE include arthritis in the older animal and a lowered mid yield owing to mastitis. Most goats contract the disease at a young age and continue to test positive for life. Transmission is primarily by milk or colostrum.


Other clinical signs include poor coat conditions, hard udder syndrome, paralysis in kids’ legs and hair loss. 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Celebrity chefs urge public to get baking to support Cats Protection fundraiser

News Story 1
 In support of Cats Protection's Pawsome Afternoon Tea fundraiser, Masterchef winner Tim Anderson and Great British Bake Off star Kim-Joy have shared biscuit recipes to help keen bakers raise money for needy cats across April.

The celebrity chefs are both cat owners and have said that they hope this fundraiser will help to raise awareness of cats in need and the importance of adopting a cat, rather than buying one.

This is the fourth year Cats Protection has run its Pawsome Afternoon Tea campaign, which encourages people to hold tea parties, bake sales and fundraising events to help raise money for the charity.

To view the recipes and other fundraising resources please visit the Cats Protection website. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.