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Lest we forget
Dogs Trust's chief executive, Owen Sharp, and 'Peanut' at the memorial
Fallen animals in war remembered

Over 16 million animals served in the First World War. They were used for transport, communication and companionship.

Horses, donkeys, mules and camels carried food, water, ammunition and medical supplies to men at the front, and dogs and pigeons carried messages. Canaries were used to detect poisonous gas, and cats and dogs were trained to hunt rats in the trenches.

On Friday 8 November, two- and four-legged guests gathered at the fifteenth Animals in War Memorial event in Hyde Park, London to pay their respects to the animals that have served and continue to serve in conflicts throughout the world.

Organised by Dogs Trust and the Petplan Charitable Trust, the event was attended by representatives from the animal welfare sector as well animals including horses from the Household Cavalry and Dogs Trust rescue dog, Peanut, a terrier cross.

Guest readers included author, Jilly Cooper, scholar and historian, Dr Hilda Kean and BBC correspondent, Gordon Corera, as well as four school children who read poetry they had written especially for the event.

Dogs Trust chief executive, Owen Sharp, commented: “It is incredibly moving to see so many organisations coming together each year to commemorate the immense bravery of the animals that served alongside our soldiers in battle. We believe that it is important that we continue to remember the animals of war and ensure they are never forgotten.”

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Zoo calls for volunteers in its hour of need

News Story 1
 As ZSL London Zoo begins to get back on its feet, the organisation is putting out a call for volunteers who have time to help out. It comes after three months of unprecedented closure, which has seen zoos across the UK come under enormous financial pressure.

Volunteers will be required to commit to a minimum of half a day each fortnight, helping to assist zoo visitors as they make their way around. Volunteer manager Rhiannon Green said: "We need cheery, flexible people who can help visitors enjoy their day while respecting the measures that keep everyone safe.

For more information, visit zsl.org. Posts are available at both London and Whipsnade Zoos. 

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News Shorts
BSAVA webinars to shine the spotlight on selected journal papers

A free series of webinars that take a closer look at selected papers published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice has been produced by the BSAVA.

In the new BSAVA Science webinar series, authors of the featured papers discuss their results with a panel and how they may impact clinical practice. The authors then answer questions submitted by audience members.

The webinars are available via the BSAVA Webinar Library, covering four different papers. JSAP editor Nicola Di Girolamo, said: "Discussing the research with the authors - experts in their field - really helps to bring the papers to life."