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High Court rejects ivory ban challenge
"I welcome today’s ruling by the High Court which upholds the UK’s commitment to ban the ivory trade" - Theresa Villiers.

Ban will come into force "as soon as possible”

A High Court challenge by the antiques sector to reverse a ban on the ivory trade has been rejected.


On Tuesday (5 November), a group of antiques dealers were unsuccessful in arguing that the Ivory Act, introduced in May 2018, is unlawful under EU law and that it would have a disproportionate and adverse effect on their businesses. 


The ruling means that the UK government will now proceed to bring into force the ivory ban ‘as soon as practicably possible’, which is likely to be early next year. 


Environment secretary Theresa Villiers said: “I welcome today’s ruling by the High Court which upholds the UK’s commitment to ban the ivory trade. We will move forward and make sure the ban comes into operation as soon as possible to protect wildlife and the environment.”

Under the Ivory Act 2018, the dealing of elephant ivory is prohibited, irrespective of its age. This includes imports and exports to and from the UK. Some ivory items are exempt from this ruling, including musical instruments made before 1975 (with an ivory content of less than 20 per cent) and sales to accredited museums. 


Environment secretary Michael Gove said the speed of the Act's passing through parliament “shows the strength of feeling on all sides of the House on this critical issue.”


Wildlife charity Born Free welcomed the bill calling it “a vindication of Born Free’s long-standing assertion that only by banning the trade in ivory can we hope to bring an end to the poaching of elephants, who are being slaughtered on an industrial scale to provide the market with tokens and trinkets”.

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New York to ban sale of foie gras

News Story 1
 New York City councillors have voted overwhelmingly in favour of legislation that will see the ban of foie gras in the city. The move, which comes in response to animal cruelty concerns, will take effect in 2022.


 Councillor Carlina Rivera, who sponsored the legislation, told the New York Times that her bill “tackles the most inhumane process” in the commercial food industry. “This is one of the most violent practices, and it’s done for a purely luxury product,” she said.


 Foie gras is a food product made of the liver of a goose or duck that has been fattened, often by force-feeding. New York City is one of America’s largest markets for the product, with around 1,000 restaurants currently offering it on their menu. 

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Humane Slaughter Association student scholarships open for applications

Applications for the Humane Slaughter Association’s student/trainee Dorothy Sidley Memorial Scholarships are now open.

The Scholarships provide funding to enable students or trainees in the industry to undertake a project aimed at improving the welfare of food animals during marketing, transport and slaughter. The project may be carried out as an integral part of a student's coursework over an academic year, or during the summer break.

The deadline for applications is midnight on the 28 February 2020. To apply and for further information visit www.hsa.org.uk/grants or contact the HSA office.