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High Court rejects ivory ban challenge
"I welcome today’s ruling by the High Court which upholds the UK’s commitment to ban the ivory trade" - Theresa Villiers.

Ban will come into force "as soon as possible”

A High Court challenge by the antiques sector to reverse a ban on the ivory trade has been rejected.


On Tuesday (5 November), a group of antiques dealers were unsuccessful in arguing that the Ivory Act, introduced in May 2018, is unlawful under EU law and that it would have a disproportionate and adverse effect on their businesses. 


The ruling means that the UK government will now proceed to bring into force the ivory ban ‘as soon as practicably possible’, which is likely to be early next year. 


Environment secretary Theresa Villiers said: “I welcome today’s ruling by the High Court which upholds the UK’s commitment to ban the ivory trade. We will move forward and make sure the ban comes into operation as soon as possible to protect wildlife and the environment.”

Under the Ivory Act 2018, the dealing of elephant ivory is prohibited, irrespective of its age. This includes imports and exports to and from the UK. Some ivory items are exempt from this ruling, including musical instruments made before 1975 (with an ivory content of less than 20 per cent) and sales to accredited museums. 


Environment secretary Michael Gove said the speed of the Act's passing through parliament “shows the strength of feeling on all sides of the House on this critical issue.”


Wildlife charity Born Free welcomed the bill calling it “a vindication of Born Free’s long-standing assertion that only by banning the trade in ivory can we hope to bring an end to the poaching of elephants, who are being slaughtered on an industrial scale to provide the market with tokens and trinkets”.

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Celebrity chefs urge public to get baking to support Cats Protection fundraiser

News Story 1
 In support of Cats Protection's Pawsome Afternoon Tea fundraiser, Masterchef winner Tim Anderson and Great British Bake Off star Kim-Joy have shared biscuit recipes to help keen bakers raise money for needy cats across April.

The celebrity chefs are both cat owners and have said that they hope this fundraiser will help to raise awareness of cats in need and the importance of adopting a cat, rather than buying one.

This is the fourth year Cats Protection has run its Pawsome Afternoon Tea campaign, which encourages people to hold tea parties, bake sales and fundraising events to help raise money for the charity.

To view the recipes and other fundraising resources please visit the Cats Protection website. 

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News Shorts
BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.