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Rising ivory prices could lead to more elephant poaching - study
Researchers fear that rising ivory prices could increase poaching incentives.

Analysis of ivory market values reveals major threat to elephant populations

The global price of ivory has increased tenfold since the 1989 CITES trade ban, according to new research, putting the lives of tens of thousands of elephants at risk.

Published in Biological Conservation, the study is the first to analyse trends in global ivory market values since the ban came into effect.

Researchers fear that rising ivory prices could increase poaching incentives, and therefore lead to a higher number of elephants being killed. The research was carried out by a team at the University of Bristol’s Veterinary School.

"With poachers killing an estimated 100 elephants of the remaining 350,000 each day, we believe our findings are significant to global wildlife conservation policy-making,” explained lead author Monique Sosnowski.

"Until now, very little has been known about global ivory prices since the international ban in 1989. We hope that a greater understanding of the factors that drive the price of ivory will lead to better informed policy interventions that lead to a more secure future for the long-term survival of elephants and other animals that suffer due to the ivory trade."

In the study, researchers analysed a large dataset of ivory prices collected between 1989 and 2017 from literature and trips to ivory markets. Together with information on the ivory product type, weight, region and legality, researchers were able to identify the factors that push up ivory prices.

They found that between 1989 and 2014, the global price of ivory increased tenfold and has been gradually decreasing since.

The variables that influenced activity were where in the world the ivory was sold, whether the ivory had been carved, whether the sale was legal, and the total of ivory estimated to have been traded that year.

Researchers hope that a greater understanding of price trends and associated demand, together with knowing what factors influence price, will help policymakers, law enforcement and conservationists better understand where to focus their efforts. 

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Celebrity chefs urge public to get baking to support Cats Protection fundraiser

News Story 1
 In support of Cats Protection's Pawsome Afternoon Tea fundraiser, Masterchef winner Tim Anderson and Great British Bake Off star Kim-Joy have shared biscuit recipes to help keen bakers raise money for needy cats across April.

The celebrity chefs are both cat owners and have said that they hope this fundraiser will help to raise awareness of cats in need and the importance of adopting a cat, rather than buying one.

This is the fourth year Cats Protection has run its Pawsome Afternoon Tea campaign, which encourages people to hold tea parties, bake sales and fundraising events to help raise money for the charity.

To view the recipes and other fundraising resources please visit the Cats Protection website. 

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BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.