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Rising ivory prices could lead to more elephant poaching - study
Researchers fear that rising ivory prices could increase poaching incentives.

Analysis of ivory market values reveals major threat to elephant populations

The global price of ivory has increased tenfold since the 1989 CITES trade ban, according to new research, putting the lives of tens of thousands of elephants at risk.

Published in Biological Conservation, the study is the first to analyse trends in global ivory market values since the ban came into effect.

Researchers fear that rising ivory prices could increase poaching incentives, and therefore lead to a higher number of elephants being killed. The research was carried out by a team at the University of Bristol’s Veterinary School.

"With poachers killing an estimated 100 elephants of the remaining 350,000 each day, we believe our findings are significant to global wildlife conservation policy-making,” explained lead author Monique Sosnowski.

"Until now, very little has been known about global ivory prices since the international ban in 1989. We hope that a greater understanding of the factors that drive the price of ivory will lead to better informed policy interventions that lead to a more secure future for the long-term survival of elephants and other animals that suffer due to the ivory trade."

In the study, researchers analysed a large dataset of ivory prices collected between 1989 and 2017 from literature and trips to ivory markets. Together with information on the ivory product type, weight, region and legality, researchers were able to identify the factors that push up ivory prices.

They found that between 1989 and 2014, the global price of ivory increased tenfold and has been gradually decreasing since.

The variables that influenced activity were where in the world the ivory was sold, whether the ivory had been carved, whether the sale was legal, and the total of ivory estimated to have been traded that year.

Researchers hope that a greater understanding of price trends and associated demand, together with knowing what factors influence price, will help policymakers, law enforcement and conservationists better understand where to focus their efforts. 

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Petplan Veterinary Awards 2020 open for nominations

News Story 1
 Nominations are open for the 2020 Petplan Veterinary Awards, a prestigious event that pays recognition to some of the UKs most notable veterinary professionals.

We have been recognising the brilliant work of the UKs veterinary professionals through the Petplan Veterinary Awards for 21 years now and every year the standard of entries just gets higher, said James Barnes, head of sales and partnerships at Petplan.

To nominate a colleague for the awards visit petplanvet.co.uk/vetawards, before nominations close on 16th January 2020. Winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on 2 April 2020 in Birmingham. 

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BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.