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Rising ivory prices could lead to more elephant poaching - study
Researchers fear that rising ivory prices could increase poaching incentives.

Analysis of ivory market values reveals major threat to elephant populations

The global price of ivory has increased tenfold since the 1989 CITES trade ban, according to new research, putting the lives of tens of thousands of elephants at risk.

Published in Biological Conservation, the study is the first to analyse trends in global ivory market values since the ban came into effect.

Researchers fear that rising ivory prices could increase poaching incentives, and therefore lead to a higher number of elephants being killed. The research was carried out by a team at the University of Bristol’s Veterinary School.

"With poachers killing an estimated 100 elephants of the remaining 350,000 each day, we believe our findings are significant to global wildlife conservation policy-making,” explained lead author Monique Sosnowski.

"Until now, very little has been known about global ivory prices since the international ban in 1989. We hope that a greater understanding of the factors that drive the price of ivory will lead to better informed policy interventions that lead to a more secure future for the long-term survival of elephants and other animals that suffer due to the ivory trade."

In the study, researchers analysed a large dataset of ivory prices collected between 1989 and 2017 from literature and trips to ivory markets. Together with information on the ivory product type, weight, region and legality, researchers were able to identify the factors that push up ivory prices.

They found that between 1989 and 2014, the global price of ivory increased tenfold and has been gradually decreasing since.

The variables that influenced activity were where in the world the ivory was sold, whether the ivory had been carved, whether the sale was legal, and the total of ivory estimated to have been traded that year.

Researchers hope that a greater understanding of price trends and associated demand, together with knowing what factors influence price, will help policymakers, law enforcement and conservationists better understand where to focus their efforts. 

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Big Butterfly Count returns

News Story 1
 The world's biggest survey of butterflies is back for 2020!

Butterfly Conservation's Big Butterfly Count launches on Friday, 17 July and will run until Sunday 9 August. Members of the public can get involved by downloading the Big Butterfly Count App or recording results on a downloadable sheet available from bigbutterflycount.org/.

'It's a fantastic activity for people from three to 103 years and we'd encourage everyone to take 15 minutes in an appropriate outdoor space during sunny conditions to simply appreciate the nature around them and do their bit to help us understand butterfly populations,' said a Butterfly Conservation spokesperson. 

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New appointment at Dechra

Dechra Veterinary Products Ltd (Dechra) has announced a key appointment to support veterinary professionals across Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Karen Hockley has been appointed as a telesales account manager and will provide the latest products, news and developments from Dechra. She joins the company from a large mixed practice in Northern Ireland where she was the branch manager.

Before that, Karen had worked for a multinational veterinary pharmaceutical company as a key account manager for Northern Ireland. She can be contacted at karen.hockley@dechra.com or 087 219 54 30.