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VMD’s annual review of adverse events published
The number of safety (adverse reaction) reports increased in only two major species, dogs and sheep.

Report highlights rise in suspected lack of efficacy reports for cats

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) has published its annual review of adverse events in animals, humans and the environment after the use of veterinary medicines.

The Veterinary Pharmacovigilance in the United Kingdom review summarises 6,721 UK adverse events reported to the VMD in 2017, an increase of 2.5 per cent on the previous year, compared to 15 per cent from 2015 to 2016.

Of the reports received, dogs were the only major species that had increased (9%). The largest decrease was for rabbits, with a fall of more than 31 per cent.

The report also highlights a considerable rise in the number of suspected lack of expected efficacy reports for cats compared to 2016. These were for products that affect the nervous system, including general anaesthetics, sedatives and analgesics.

Products for reversal of sedation also increased, as did combined treatments for the prevention of infestation by international and external parasites.

The number of safety (adverse reaction) reports increased in only two major species, dogs and sheep. The increase in dogs was owing to reports involving medicines for treating the intestines, heart and circulation, the nervous system and the ears.

Half of the products involved in sheep safety cases were anti-parasitics, with 50 per cent of those being wormers. 

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Face covering rules expanded

News Story 1
 New rules came into force in England on Saturday (8 August) making it mandatory for clients to wear a face covering in veterinary practices.

The rules, which also apply to cinemas, museums and places of worship, follow a recent spike in coronavirus cases. All clients in England must now wear a face covering when inside a veterinary practice unless they are exempt for age, health or equality reasons. 

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News Shorts
BSAVA webinars to shine the spotlight on selected journal papers

A free series of webinars that take a closer look at selected papers published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice has been produced by the BSAVA.

In the new BSAVA Science webinar series, authors of the featured papers discuss their results with a panel and how they may impact clinical practice. The authors then answer questions submitted by audience members.

The webinars are available via the BSAVA Webinar Library, covering four different papers. JSAP editor Nicola Di Girolamo, said: "Discussing the research with the authors - experts in their field - really helps to bring the papers to life."