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Injured marsh harrier found in Norfolk
Once on the brink of extinction, the UK’s marsh harriers have seen a rise in numbers in recent years.
Photograph reveals bird had been shot

Norfolk Police are inviting members of the public to come forward with information after a male marsh harrier was found injured near Fakenham.

The bird was identified by a dog walker on the boundary of The Hawk and Owl Trust Nature Reserve at Sculthorpe Moore. Unfortunately, the dog walker was unable to take the bird to rescue, but he did take a photograph which revealed the bird had been shot.

The member of the public contacted staff at the nature reserve. But a subsequent search failed to find the bird; only broken down vegetation and a few feathers remained.

With the male marsh harrier having not been seen since, experts say his absence puts this year’s chicks at risk as both parents are required to supply them with enough food. Police are now urging anyone with any information to contact Jason Pegden ((PC1257 - Wells SNT (C11), North Norfolk LDU) on 101.

Nigel Middleton, Sculthorpe Moor reserve manager, said “We hear of birds of prey being killed illegally so often. Illegal persecution is such a problem and it’s inexcusable.

“Having it happen on our doorstep has come as a real shock. Marsh Harriers are the reason that Sculthorpe is a reserve. This is just horrifying. If anyone knows anything please let the police know. Let’s bring this criminal to justice”.

The Hawk and Owl Trust Nature Reserve recently announced the acquisition of more than 150 acres of land on either side of its existing 45-acre reserve. It is on the western side of the land, near Sculthorpe Mill, that the bird was found.

Once on the brink of extinction, the UK’s marsh harriers have seen a rise in numbers in recent years, thanks to a ban on pesticides. The birds feed on rodents, birds, insects, reptiles, frogs and even, on occasion, fish. 

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Big Butterfly Count returns

News Story 1
 The world's biggest survey of butterflies is back for 2020!

Butterfly Conservation's Big Butterfly Count launches on Friday, 17 July and will run until Sunday 9 August. Members of the public can get involved by downloading the Big Butterfly Count App or recording results on a downloadable sheet available from bigbutterflycount.org/.

'It's a fantastic activity for people from three to 103 years and we'd encourage everyone to take 15 minutes in an appropriate outdoor space during sunny conditions to simply appreciate the nature around them and do their bit to help us understand butterfly populations,' said a Butterfly Conservation spokesperson. 

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News Shorts
New appointment at Dechra

Dechra Veterinary Products Ltd (Dechra) has announced a key appointment to support veterinary professionals across Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Karen Hockley has been appointed as a telesales account manager and will provide the latest products, news and developments from Dechra. She joins the company from a large mixed practice in Northern Ireland where she was the branch manager.

Before that, Karen had worked for a multinational veterinary pharmaceutical company as a key account manager for Northern Ireland. She can be contacted at karen.hockley@dechra.com or 087 219 54 30.