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Injured marsh harrier found in Norfolk
Once on the brink of extinction, the UK’s marsh harriers have seen a rise in numbers in recent years.
Photograph reveals bird had been shot

Norfolk Police are inviting members of the public to come forward with information after a male marsh harrier was found injured near Fakenham.

The bird was identified by a dog walker on the boundary of The Hawk and Owl Trust Nature Reserve at Sculthorpe Moore. Unfortunately, the dog walker was unable to take the bird to rescue, but he did take a photograph which revealed the bird had been shot.

The member of the public contacted staff at the nature reserve. But a subsequent search failed to find the bird; only broken down vegetation and a few feathers remained.

With the male marsh harrier having not been seen since, experts say his absence puts this year’s chicks at risk as both parents are required to supply them with enough food. Police are now urging anyone with any information to contact Jason Pegden ((PC1257 - Wells SNT (C11), North Norfolk LDU) on 101.

Nigel Middleton, Sculthorpe Moor reserve manager, said “We hear of birds of prey being killed illegally so often. Illegal persecution is such a problem and it’s inexcusable.

“Having it happen on our doorstep has come as a real shock. Marsh Harriers are the reason that Sculthorpe is a reserve. This is just horrifying. If anyone knows anything please let the police know. Let’s bring this criminal to justice”.

The Hawk and Owl Trust Nature Reserve recently announced the acquisition of more than 150 acres of land on either side of its existing 45-acre reserve. It is on the western side of the land, near Sculthorpe Mill, that the bird was found.

Once on the brink of extinction, the UK’s marsh harriers have seen a rise in numbers in recent years, thanks to a ban on pesticides. The birds feed on rodents, birds, insects, reptiles, frogs and even, on occasion, fish. 

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Veterinary Evidence Student Awards winners revealed

News Story 1
 The first winners of the RCVS Knowledge Veterinary Evidence Student Awards have been revealed.

Molly Vasanthakumar scooped first prize for her knowledge summary comparing the ecological impact of woven versus disposable drapes. She found that there is not enough evidence that disposable synthetics reduce the risk of surgical site.

Second prize went to Honoria Brown of the University of Cambridge, for her paper: ‘Can hoof wall temperature and digital pulse pressure be used as sensitive non-invasive diagnostic indicators of acute laminitis onset?’

Edinburgh’s Jacqueline Oi Ping Tong won third prize for critically appraising the evidence for whether a daily probiotic improved clinical outcomes in dogs with idiopathic diarrhoea. The papers have all achieved publication in RCVS Knowledge’s peer-reviewed journal, Veterinary Evidence.  

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News Shorts
Animal Welfare Foundation seeks new trustees

The Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF) seeks three new trustees to help drive the charity’s mission to improve animal welfare through veterinary science, education and debate.

Veterinary and animal welfare professionals from across the UK may apply, particularly those with experience in equine and small animal practice and research management. Trustees must attend at least two meetings a year, as well as the annual AWF Discussion Forum in London.

For more information about the role, visit www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk. Applications close at midnight on 13 August 2019.