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Rescue seals named after royal couple
The rescue centre urged the public to show ‘decorum’ when it comes to animals found on the beach.
Meghan Mackerel and Prince Herring were born prematurely 

A pair of rescued seals have been named ‘Prince Herring’ and ‘Meghan Mackerel’, in honour of the royal couple Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

The seals (not pictured) were rescued separately in June by Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre, where they now reside. Meghan Mackerel was found alone on Sidney Island near Victoria on June 18, with no sign of her mother.

She was underweight, had remnants of her umbilical cord still attached and was still covered in soft fur, suggesting she was born prematurely.

Prince Herring was also born prematurely and was found two days later in a marsh located inland from Crescent Beach. He was still attached to the placenta but his mother was nowhere in sight.

In a statement, the rescue centre urged the public to show ‘decorum’ when it comes to animals found on the beach.

Assistant manager Emily Johnson said: "Mothers will often leave their pups on shore while they forage for food; they will usually make it back. We ask those who find a seal pup not to touch it and to keep their pets away. Call us, we'll assess the animal, then decide if a rescue is needed."

Members of the public can symbolically ‘adopt’ Meghan or Herring to help fund ongoing rehabilitation efforts at the centre, which rescues, rehabilitates and releases around 150 animals a year.

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New York to ban sale of foie gras

News Story 1
 New York City councillors have voted overwhelmingly in favour of legislation that will see the ban of foie gras in the city. The move, which comes in response to animal cruelty concerns, will take effect in 2022.


 Councillor Carlina Rivera, who sponsored the legislation, told the New York Times that her bill “tackles the most inhumane process” in the commercial food industry. “This is one of the most violent practices, and it’s done for a purely luxury product,” she said.


 Foie gras is a food product made of the liver of a goose or duck that has been fattened, often by force-feeding. New York City is one of America’s largest markets for the product, with around 1,000 restaurants currently offering it on their menu. 

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Humane Slaughter Association student scholarships open for applications

Applications for the Humane Slaughter Association’s student/trainee Dorothy Sidley Memorial Scholarships are now open.

The Scholarships provide funding to enable students or trainees in the industry to undertake a project aimed at improving the welfare of food animals during marketing, transport and slaughter. The project may be carried out as an integral part of a student's coursework over an academic year, or during the summer break.

The deadline for applications is midnight on the 28 February 2020. To apply and for further information visit www.hsa.org.uk/grants or contact the HSA office.