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Dolphins ‘form friendships based on shared interests’
An international research team studied 124 male dolphins at Shark Bay. (Stock photo)
Study finds similarities in human and dolphin friendships 

New research suggests dolphins form friendships based on shared interests, in a similar way to humans.

An international research team studied 124 male dolphins at Shark Bay, a World Heritage area in Western Australia, which is home to an iconic population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

Shark Bay is the only place where dolphins have been observed using marine sponges as foraging tools, a learnt technique passed down from one generation to the next. It allows certain dolphins, known as ‘spongers’, to find food in deeper water channels.

Using behavioural, genetic and photographic data collected during the winter months over a nine-year period (2007-2015), the team analysed a sub-set of 37 male dolphins, comprising 13 spongers and 24 non-spongers.

They found that male spongers spent more time associating with other male spongers than non-spongers. These bonds were based on similar foraging techniques, not relatedness or other factors.

Co-author Dr Simon Allen, of the University of Bristol, said: "Foraging with a sponge is a time-consuming and largely solitary activity so it was long thought incompatible with the needs of male dolphins in Shark Bay – to invest time in forming close alliances with other males.

“This study suggests that, like their female counterparts and indeed like humans, male dolphins form social bonds based on shared interests.”

Manuela Bizzozzero, lead author of the study at the University of Zurich, added: "Male dolphins in Shark Bay exhibit a fascinating social system of nested alliance formation. These strong bonds between males can last for decades and are critical to each male’s mating success.

“We were very excited to discover alliances of spongers, dolphins forming close friendships with others with similar traits."

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Do you know a practice wellbeing star?

News Story 1
 Has someone in your practice team gone above and beyond to make your workplace a positive one during the coronavirus pandemic? Then why not nominate them for a 2020 Practice Wellbeing Star!

The joint RCVS Mind Matters Initiative/SPVS Practice Wellbeing Star nominations recognise individuals who have held up morale during a time when practices are facing unprecedented staffing and financial issues.

Nominees receive a certificate in recognition of their colleagues' appreciation of their achievements and will be entered into the prize draw for a pair of tickets to attend the joint SPVS and Veterinary Management Group Congress in January 2021.

 

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WellVet reopens ticket sales to online conference platform

Following the success of its online conference, the organisers behind WellVet Weekend have re-opened ticket sales to allow new delegates to access session recordings and its online networking platform.

The day-long conference saw more than 360 veterinary professionals mix activity sessions with personal development CPD, all hosted within a virtual conference platform. Now, with more than 500 minutes of CPD available, the resource is being re-opened to allow full access to the session recordings until May 2021.

Sessions are aimed at providing delegates with a range of proactive wellbeing tools to explore to find ways of improving their mental and physical health. Tickets are limited in number and on sale at wellvet.co.uk until 30th August 2020.