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Dolphins ‘form friendships based on shared interests’
An international research team studied 124 male dolphins at Shark Bay. (Stock photo)
Study finds similarities in human and dolphin friendships 

New research suggests dolphins form friendships based on shared interests, in a similar way to humans.

An international research team studied 124 male dolphins at Shark Bay, a World Heritage area in Western Australia, which is home to an iconic population of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

Shark Bay is the only place where dolphins have been observed using marine sponges as foraging tools, a learnt technique passed down from one generation to the next. It allows certain dolphins, known as ‘spongers’, to find food in deeper water channels.

Using behavioural, genetic and photographic data collected during the winter months over a nine-year period (2007-2015), the team analysed a sub-set of 37 male dolphins, comprising 13 spongers and 24 non-spongers.

They found that male spongers spent more time associating with other male spongers than non-spongers. These bonds were based on similar foraging techniques, not relatedness or other factors.

Co-author Dr Simon Allen, of the University of Bristol, said: "Foraging with a sponge is a time-consuming and largely solitary activity so it was long thought incompatible with the needs of male dolphins in Shark Bay – to invest time in forming close alliances with other males.

“This study suggests that, like their female counterparts and indeed like humans, male dolphins form social bonds based on shared interests.”

Manuela Bizzozzero, lead author of the study at the University of Zurich, added: "Male dolphins in Shark Bay exhibit a fascinating social system of nested alliance formation. These strong bonds between males can last for decades and are critical to each male’s mating success.

“We were very excited to discover alliances of spongers, dolphins forming close friendships with others with similar traits."

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New 'DoggyLottery' to raise funds for rescue centres

News Story 1
 A new 'DoggyLottery' to raise funds for dog rescue centres in the UK will launch on Saturday (4 July). Every four weeks, five different rescue centres will be connected to the lottery, providing much-needed funds - particularly during COVID-19 - and providing vital online exposure.

A weekly game costs £1.50 and entrants will have the chance of being one of 20 guaranteed winners. A massive 60 per cent of the raised funds will go towards the dog rescue centres, more than double that donated by leading lottery companies to charitable causes.

To find out more and play the lottery, visit www.doggylottery.co.uk  

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International Cat Care appoints new head of veterinary division

International Cat Care (ICC) has announced the appointment of Nathalie Dowgray as head of the charity's veterinary division.

Nathalie, who is an RCVS advanced practitioner in feline medicine, will lead the International Society of Feline Medicine (ISFM) and a play key role in advancing knowledge and research in feline medicine.

Claire Bessant, iCatCare's chief executive said: "We're absolutely delighted to be welcoming Nathalie to the charity. She brings a depth and breadth of feline expertise and understanding which fits perfectly with the charity's work and development, and her enthusiasm for cats is infectious."