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Study reveals new insights into dog tooth fractures
The most common fracture among all samples in the study was a crown fracture.
Research follows increased concern over chew toys

A new study has investigated the external forces required to fracture a dog’s teeth while chewing.

Published in Frontiers In Veterinary Science, the study comes amid growing concern about the role of chewing on treats and toys in the fracture of large cheek teeth.

Researchers took 24 maximally pre-molar teeth, extracted from dog cadavers, and potted them in cylinders filled with acrylic. The cylinders were placed angles of 60 degrees before the team carried out an axial compression test.

They found that the highest force prior to a tooth fracturing was 1,281 N at an angle of 59.7 degrees. The most common fracture among all samples in the study was a crown fracture, followed by an uncomplicated crown fracture, complicated crown-root fracture and and uncomplicated crown-root fracture, respectively.

The researchers found no significant associations between dog breed, age, weight, impact angle, crown height or diameter, and the maximum force applied to the fracture. Crown height to diameter ratio was the only variable that remained significantly associated with maximum force, suggesting that a decreased ratio can improve resistance to tooth fracture.

‘The mean maximum force sustained by the tested teeth prior to fracture was within the maximum chewing capability of the average dog,’ the researchers conclude. ‘Dogs routinely exposed to hard treats and toys that do not yield significantly below this point might be at increased risk of fracture of maxillary fourth premolar teeth as a result of overexertion during chewing.’

The study was conducted by the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with Mars Petcare and North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. 

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Endangered turtles rescued from smugglers

News Story 1
 A group of endangered turtles have found a new home at London Zoo after being rescued from smugglers.

The four big-headed turtles arrived at the zoo at the end of last year, after smugglers tried to illegally import them to Canada, labelled as toys.

One of the turtles, named Lady Triệu after a Vietnamese warrioress, has moved to a new exhibit in the zoo’s reptile house. She is the only one of her kind in a UK zoo.

Big-headed turtles have such large heads that they cannot pull them back into their shells. To compensate, they have armour plating from head to tail and a very sharp beak to fend off predators. They are ranked number 18 on ZSL’s EDGE of Existence reptile list, which puts threatened species at the forefront of conservation action. Image © ZSL  

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Professor Abdul Rahman announced as keynote speaker for BVA Members’ Day 2019

Celebrated Indian vet and parasitologist Professor Abdul Rahman is set to deliver the keynote speech at BVA Members’ Day 2019.

Professor Rahman will present his insights into the human behaviour challenges of controlling zoonotic disease in his talk: ‘A One Health approach to rabies elimination in Asia’. The talk will outline efforts to gain political support for dog vaccination programmes in China, as well as the need for a collaborative approach between vets, public health, livestock and animal welfare agencies.

The event takes place on Thursday, 19 September at Brangwyn Hall, Swansea. Tickets are free but must be reserved through the BVA website as places are limited.