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NOAH issues warning over ‘anti-vaxx’ movement
Vaccinations in dogs and cats fell by seven per cent from 2011-2017.
Vaccine hesitancy could give rise to serious preventable diseases

The National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) is warning that the ‘anti-vaxx’ movement could give rise to deadly diseases in pets and humans alike, as pet owners become increasingly cautious about vaccinations.

Chief executive Dawn Howard said vaccination has “to some extent become a victim of its own success” as many pet owners no longer see preventable diseases such as parvovirus and canine distemper first hand, meaning they may not see vaccinations as necessary.

According to the latest figures from the PDSA Animal Wellbeing report, vaccinations in dogs and cats fell by seven per cent from 2011-2017. Furthermore, just 50 per cent of rabbits had received a primary vaccination in 2017 and only 55 per cent received annual boosters. NOAH said vaccine coverage is falling ‘dangerously low’ for achieving herd immunity.

Misconceptions surrounding vaccinations are another potential problem - for example, many owners believe indoor cats do not need vaccinations.

Anti-vaxx sentiment is also thought to be on the rise. In human medicine in the US, the anti-vaxx movement has prompted an emergency outbreak of measles in New York state. Measles cases rose sharply in the UK in 2018, mainly spreading from Europe, but particularly in teenagers who were not vaccinated when young.

“Vaccine hesitancy has been named by the World health Organisation (WHO) as one of the top 10 health threats of the year,” Ms Howard said. “It has been suggested by a leading vet that lack of uptake in the veterinary medicine sector could similarly increase the risk of previously eradicated or seldom seen diseases in our pets.”

It is also “important to understand and overcome” barriers to vaccination, she added. NOAH is urging pet owners to speak to their vet about the best way to protect their pet.

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RCVS Fellowship applications open

News Story 1
 Applications have now opened for RCVS Fellowship 2022. The RCVS is encouraging anyone who would like to be considered for Fellowship to apply, and if successful, they will be welcomed into the Fellowship next year.

The process for joining the fellowship has changed slightly for this year, as applicants will now need two signed referee forms instead of three professional references, and five assessors will review each application instead of three.

The deadline for applications is 14 February 2022, and more information on how to apply can be found here. If applicants have any questions, or would like informal advice from previous successful applicants, they are encouraged to contact Ceri Via Email 

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Horiba announces veterinary haematology webinar

Horiba Medical has announced a free webinar providing practical insight on best practice in veterinary haematology. Entitled 'In practice haematology - Beyond the pale!' the webinar will be presented by Ronnie Barron from the University of Glasgow Veterinary School.

Ronnie's presentation, which will conclude with a Q&A session, will look at QC and artefacts of sample quality and review the effects of different pathologies. Using images, photomicrographs and video links, he will also explain the techniques and equipment needed to complement analytical automation to confirm results quality.

The webinar takes place on Thursday, October 28 (7.30-9pm). For more details and to register, click here.