Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

AMR gene spreads between pets at UK animal hospital
Four isolates tested positive for the gene optrA and there was evidence of transmission between animals.
Practices urged to ensure adequate cleaning to reduce transmission 

A gene that allows bacteria to become resistant to linezolid, a last resort human antibiotic, has been found in four pets at a UK veterinary hospital for the first time.

Scientists from Public Health England (PHE) said the discovery is “concerning” as transmission of this organism to owners carries the risk of spread to other bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, leading to hard-to-treat infections.

Linezolid is used to treat certain bacterial infections in humans, such as streptococci and MRSA, but it is not licensed for veterinary use in the UK.

Routine testing at the affected veterinary hospital revealed an Enterococcus faecalis isolate from a cat wound swab, which was referred to PHE. Scientists subsequently analysed three other E faecalis isolates from two cats and one dog from the same hospital, but different households.

Four isolates from three wound swabs and a cat rectal swab were found to be resistant to linezolid and gentamicin. All four isolates were also positive for optrA and there was evidence of transmission between animals. PHE said it is the first known report of optrA-positive enterococci isolated from UK pets.

The findings were presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases in Amsterdam (13-16 April).

Lead author Dr Katie Hopkins said veterinary practices must ensure adequate cleaning takes place to minimise transmission of resistant bacteria between companion animals and people. Standard protocols for managing colonised or infected animals should prevent transmission to veterinary staff, she added. Pet owners should also wash their hands after handling pets.

In the above case, further transmission was halted by cleaning and decontamination and there is no evidence that humans became infected.

Dr Hopkins added: “Our findings further the 'One-Health' view that antibiotic-resistant bacteria can be shared by animals and humans, although the direction of transfer is often difficult to prove.

“We currently do not know the prevalence of linezolid-resistant enterococci in companion animals and therefore a joint approach to monitoring emergence and dissemination of resistance mechanisms of public health importance is needed.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Registrations open for overseas veterinary professionals course

News Story 1
 Registrations are now open for the RCVS CPD course for overseas veterinary professionals, which covers an introduction to the UK veterinary professions.

The course is aimed at overseas-qualified veterinary surgeons and nurses during their first two years of working in the UK, in addition to those considering working here. It provides graduates with the key information and skills required to practice in the UK, as well as helping them understand their legal duties as veterinary professionals.

For more information and to book your place please click here. The course will be held at Belgravia House, London, on Wednesday 12 June.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BVA launches award to celebrate young vets

A new award has been launched to celebrate inspirational young vets who are making a difference in their day to day work.

Nominations are now open for the BVA Young Vet of the Year Award, which is the first of its kind. It is open to all vets registered with the RCVS in the first eight years of their careers, working in any veterinary sphere, including clinical practice, research, education or veterinary politics. Organisers are looking for an ‘exceptional young vet’ whose work has benefitted the veterinary community or the workplace.

The awards are open for self-entry and nominations by 1 August 2019. The winner will be announced at London Vet Show on 14 November 2019, where a £1000 cash prize will be awarded, alongside a ‘career enhancing experience’ with Zoetis.