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BSAVA updates OVs on pet travel after Brexit
If the UK becomes an ‘unlisted’ country, OVs will need to issue EU Animal Health Certificates for small animals travelling to the EU.
Animal health certificates now available to order

The BSAVA has published updated guidance for official veterinarians (OVs) on pet travel in the event that Britain leaves the EU without a deal.

The update notes that if the UK becomes an ‘unlisted’ or a Part 2 country, OVs will need to issue EU Animal Health Certificates (AHCs) for pet dogs, cats and ferrets travelling to the EU, instead of pet passports.

The forms are now available and an email has been sent to all qualified OVs containing a link to the AHC order form and notes on how to complete and use AHCs.

The update also includes information on the number of additional staff that have been employed by the APHA and the Centre for International Trade. It notes that stocks of reagents for rabies and export testing have been increased significantly to mitigate potential supply problems.

BSAVA adds that the number of rabies samples being processed at APHA Weybridge has increased from 100 a week to more than 400 week, ‘so there is good evidence that pet owners are working with their vets in making preparations for any potential changes to pet travel.’

It says there has been a 10 per cent failure rate for rabies serology samples and therefore vets are being urged to manage pet owner expectations and make them aware that a re-test or vaccine boost may be needed. 

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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RCVS names Professor John Innes as chair of Fellowship Board

Professor John Innes has been elected chair of the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Board, replacing Professor Nick Bacon who comes to the end of his three-year term.


Professor Innes will be responsible for making sure the Fellowship progresses towards fulfilling its strategic goals, determining its ongoing strategy and objectives, and reporting to the RCVS Advancement of the Professions Committee on developments within the Fellowship.