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BSAVA updates OVs on pet travel after Brexit
If the UK becomes an ‘unlisted’ country, OVs will need to issue EU Animal Health Certificates for small animals travelling to the EU.
Animal health certificates now available to order

The BSAVA has published updated guidance for official veterinarians (OVs) on pet travel in the event that Britain leaves the EU without a deal.

The update notes that if the UK becomes an ‘unlisted’ or a Part 2 country, OVs will need to issue EU Animal Health Certificates (AHCs) for pet dogs, cats and ferrets travelling to the EU, instead of pet passports.

The forms are now available and an email has been sent to all qualified OVs containing a link to the AHC order form and notes on how to complete and use AHCs.

The update also includes information on the number of additional staff that have been employed by the APHA and the Centre for International Trade. It notes that stocks of reagents for rabies and export testing have been increased significantly to mitigate potential supply problems.

BSAVA adds that the number of rabies samples being processed at APHA Weybridge has increased from 100 a week to more than 400 week, ‘so there is good evidence that pet owners are working with their vets in making preparations for any potential changes to pet travel.’

It says there has been a 10 per cent failure rate for rabies serology samples and therefore vets are being urged to manage pet owner expectations and make them aware that a re-test or vaccine boost may be needed. 

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Huge spike in ‘designer’ dogs going into rescue

News Story 1
 The RSPCA has reported a huge spike in the number of ‘designer’ dogs arriving into its care.

Figures published by the charity show there has been a 517 per cent increase in the number of French bulldogs arriving into its kennels. During that time, the charity has also seen an increase in dachshunds, chihuahuas, and crossbreeds.

RSPCA dog welfare expert Lisa Hens said: “We know that the breeds of dog coming into our care often reflect the trends in dog ownership in the wider world and, at the moment, it doesn’t get more trendy than ‘designer’ dogs like French bulldogs and Dachshunds."

 

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News Shorts
Withdrawal period increased for Closamectin pour-on

The withdrawal period for Closamectin pour-on solution for cattle has been increased from 28 days to 58 for meat and offal.

Closamectin treats roundworms, late immature to adult fluke (from seven weeks), mange mites and lice.

Norbrook Laboratories Ltd said the change would take effect immediately. Customers are being offered practical support to inform end users.

The change meets industry requirements to reduce the amount of residue going into food and the environment. It has been approved by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate and an updated summary of product characteristics will be available on the website.