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New scheme to help horse owners identify colic
Ninety per cent of horse owners struggle to spot the early signs of colic.

Research shows majority of owners struggle to spot the early signs

A novel scheme to help horse owners identify the early signs of colic has been launched by the University of Nottingham and the British Horse Society.

The ‘Vet REACT Colic Champions’ initiative comes in response to research that found one in three emergency veterinary call outs were due to equine colic, and that 90 per cent of horse owners struggle to spot the early signs of this deadly condition.

Backed by more than 60 veterinary surgeries, it will see vets across the United Kingdom raise awareness of colic further by giving their clients advice, presentations and resources. In turn it is hoped this will enable owners to develop their own plan should their horse develop the condition and need referral to an equine practice.

Emmeline Hannelly, welfare education manager at the BHS said: “It’s fantastic that so many vets are supporting our ‘Vet REACT Colic Champions’ scheme – we are delighted to be working with them! We hope that it will help even more owners to make informed decisions related to colic and in turn, improve equine welfare.”

Sarah Freeman, professor of veterinary surgery at the University of Nottingham said: “We are delighted to be working with vet practices on the ‘Vet REACT Colic Champions’ scheme. Their support and guidance have been a huge help in reaching such a wide population and we hope we can reach even more people in the future.”

Alex Kingdon, BVM BVS MRCVS from Avonvale Equine Practice added: “Being part of the ‘Vet REACT Colic Champions’ scheme is incredibly important to our practice. Colic is by far one of the most common emergency conditions we see, and the scheme has already had a huge impact on many horse owners.”

The Vet Champions scheme forms part of a wider initiative by the University of Nottingham and the British Horse Society to raise awareness of colic. More details about the campaigns can be found here

Image (C) Marie Rippingale.

 

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Stephen Fry lends voice to frog conservation film

News Story 1
 Comedian and author Stephen Fry has lent his voice to a new animation that hopes to raise awareness of deadly ranavirus, which is threatening the UK’s frogs.

Research by ZSL, who created the short film, suggests that at least 20 per cent of ranavirus cases over the past three decades, could be attributed to human introductions. This includes pond owners introducing fish, frog spawn and plants from other environments.

Amphibian disease expert Dr Stephen Price said: “People can help stop the spread by avoiding moving potentially infected material such as spawn, tadpoles, pond water and plants into their own pond. Disinfecting footwear or pond nets before using them elsewhere will also help.” 

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News Shorts
Scotland to fund OV training

The Scottish Government has revealed it will fund training for new Official Veterinarians (OVs), covering the Essential Skills, Statutory Surveillance and TB Testing.

Funding will also be provided for the revalidation of Essential Skills, as well as TB Testing for existing OVs. This is the second round of financial support from the Scottish Government for OVs.

BVA president Simon Doherty said he is “delighted” with the announcement.

“Official Veterinarians’ work in safeguarding animal health and welfare and ensuring food safety is invaluable,” he added. “This announcement has come at a crucial time, with Brexit and an uncertain future ahead, the role of OVs will be more important than ever in enabling the UK’s trade in animal products.