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Study suggests Alabama Rot may be seasonal
The study found that 95 per cent of Alabama Rot cases occurred between November and May.
Findings will help researchers explore possible triggers for the disease

New research into Alabama Rot has revealed a distinct seasonal pattern for when cases are most likely to occur.

The study, led by the RVC and Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists, revealed that 95 per cent of cases were confirmed between November and May.

It also found that most cases occurred in the west and south of England. Far fewer cases have been reported from the east of the country, in particular, East Anglia.

The research was funded by the New Forest Dog Owners Group and the charity Alabama Rot Research Fund.

“A distinct seasonal pattern is suggested, with the vast majority of cases occurring between November and March, and limited cases over the summer months – just 6.5 per cent of cases have been confirmed from June to October,” said co-author David Walked from Anderson Moores.

“In the scientific world a lot of research is not earth-shattering, but it all builds together and little by little we make progress. This information is good in terms of how we manage the next stage of research, however, we need to be careful and not jump to any conclusions at this point.”

Alabama Rot has been reported in a wide range of breeds, but due to the small number of cases, it is not possible to say with certainty which breeds have an inherent risk of contracting the disease.

Researchers say any patterns may simply be the result of varying breed populations in different parts of the UK. Vets4Pets director of clinical services Dr Huw Stacey, who has been actively supporting research on the condition, said:

“Since we held the first Alabama Rot conference in May 2017, vets and relevant professionals have been working hard to understand more about the condition. We know how the disease presents and how it affects dogs internally, and this research adds some interesting information that may help to increase vets’ index of suspicion for the disease.
 
“The information on climate and ground type will help us further explore possible triggers for the disease, but at the moment we can’t say if any breeds are more likely to develop the disease.”

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RCVS Fellowship applications open

News Story 1
 Applications have now opened for RCVS Fellowship 2022. The RCVS is encouraging anyone who would like to be considered for Fellowship to apply, and if successful, they will be welcomed into the Fellowship next year.

The process for joining the fellowship has changed slightly for this year, as applicants will now need two signed referee forms instead of three professional references, and five assessors will review each application instead of three.

The deadline for applications is 14 February 2022, and more information on how to apply can be found here. If applicants have any questions, or would like informal advice from previous successful applicants, they are encouraged to contact Ceri Via Email 

Click here for more...
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Horiba announces veterinary haematology webinar

Horiba Medical has announced a free webinar providing practical insight on best practice in veterinary haematology. Entitled 'In practice haematology - Beyond the pale!' the webinar will be presented by Ronnie Barron from the University of Glasgow Veterinary School.

Ronnie's presentation, which will conclude with a Q&A session, will look at QC and artefacts of sample quality and review the effects of different pathologies. Using images, photomicrographs and video links, he will also explain the techniques and equipment needed to complement analytical automation to confirm results quality.

The webinar takes place on Thursday, October 28 (7.30-9pm). For more details and to register, click here.