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Climate Change: A Factor in Emerging Animal Diseases?
The detection of links between animal production systems around the world, climate change and the epidemiological evolution of animal diseases was the focus of a recent meeting organised by the OIE with experts from several continents.
 

“The experts confirmed that there are correlations between the various factors linking animal production systems, human influence on the environment, climate change and emerging diseases, but they reaffirmed that these correlations involve mechanisms of very great complexity, making them extremely difficult to measure and the value of any forecasts most uncertain”, declared Dr Gideon Brückner from South Africa, who chaired the group of experts.

Human impact on the environment and climate change are not without consequences for the epidemiological evolution of certain pathogens capable of causing animal and/or human diseases. The OIE state that the world is currently witnessing an acceleration of the emergence or re-emergence of unexpected epidemiological events: for example, at least one new disease appears every year.

these correlations involve mechanisms of very great complexity, making them extremely difficult to measure and the value of any forecasts most uncertain

Dr Gideon Brückner
The OIE experts recommended investing even more in research to confirm or rule out causal links between climate change and emerging or re-emerging diseases.

“For a number of years the OIE has been implementing policies aimed at helping its Member Countries to be better prepared for the consequences of intensified animal production. The aim is to meet world demand and to be prepared to deal with new epidemiological events, most of which are related to human-caused environmental changes” stated Dr Vallat, Director General of THE OIE.

To that end the OIE supports its Member Countries by helping them to strengthen their Veterinary Services through a procedure known as the PVS (Performance of Veterinary Services). Throughout the world, these Services are in the frontline, alongside animal producers, to ensure early detection and rapid response to deal with sanitary events presenting a threat to animals and humans.

The OIE also urges the unremitting development of research programmes aimed at devising environmentally friendly animal production systems and, in parallel, suitable biosecurity methods to ensure better disease prevention and control.

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Laura Muir wins gold at Commonwealth Games

News Story 1
 Veterinary surgeon and Olympic silver-medalist Laura Muir scooped the gold medal in the 1500m final Commonwealth Games on Sunday.

Winning Scotland's 12th title of the games, Muir finished in four minutes 2.75 seconds, collecting her second medal in 24 hours.

Dr Muir commented on her win: "I just thought my strength is in my kick and I just tried to trust it and hope nobody would catch me. I ran as hard as I could to the line.

"It is so nice to come here and not just get one medal but two and in such a competitive field. Those girls are fast. It means a lot." 

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News Shorts
Views sought on NOAH Compendium

Users of the National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) Compendium app and website are being asked to share their views on how it can be improved.

In a new survey, users are asked about some suggested future developments, such as notifications for new and updated datasheets, sharing links to datasheets, and enhanced search functionality.

It comes after NOAH ceased publication of the NOAH Compendium book as part of its sustainability and environmental commitments. The website and the app will now be the main routes to access datasheets and view any changes.