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BEVA asks horse owners to return unused antibiotics
Antimicriobial Awareness Week is running from 18-24 November.
The association has urged everyone to play their part to tackle resistance.

With Antimicrobial Awareness Week (18-24 November 2023) set to begin, the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is asking horse owners not to hoard unused antibiotics.

The organisation has reminded owners that irresponsible antibiotic use can lead to resistance developing, making antibiotics less effective.

BEVA’s past president David Rendle said: “Giving random, left over or old antibiotics to your horse for a suspected infection is irresponsible and potentially dangerous.

“It could make things worse, as they might not be the right type of antibiotic for that specific infection and could easily contribute to the problem of resistance. People also forget that antibiotics are not without risk and their use can trigger serious – even fatal – intestinal disease.”

Instead of stockpiling old medicines, BEVA is advising horse owners to return any unused antibiotics to their veterinary practice.

BEVA president Roger Smith added: “It is crucial not to throw old medicines away in the rubbish or flush them down the loo, as they can eventually return to the environment, contaminating soil and watercourses and cause damage to wildlife.

“The problems we are seeing with antimicrobial resistance is relevant to all vets and all horse owners, and we must all act to reduce the development of resistance.”

BEVA provides a ‘Protect Me Toolkit' for members, which contains posters and fact sheets about responsible antimicrobial use to share with clients.

Image © Shutterstock

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Charities' XL bully neutering scheme closes

News Story 1
 A scheme that helped owners of XL bully dogs with the cost of neutering has closed to new applications due to high demand.

The scheme, run by the RSPCA, Blue Cross, and Battersea, has helped 1,800 dogs and their owners after XL bullies were banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

In England and Wales, owners of XL bully dogs which were over one year old on 31 January 2021 have until 30 June 2024 to get their dog neutered. If a dog was between seven months and 12 months old, it must be neutered by 31 December 2024. If it was under seven months old, owners have until 30 June 2025.

More information can be found on the Defra website. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Avian flu cattle outbreak spreads to tenth US state

Cattle in two dairy herds in Iowa have tested positive for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), making it the tenth state in the USA to be affected by the ongoing outbreak of the disease in cattle.

Since March 2024, more than 80 herds across the USA have been affected by the virus and three dairy workers have tested positive. Authorities have introduced measures to limit the spread of the virus and farmers have been urged to strengthen their biosecurity protocols.

Mike Naig, Iowa secretary of agriculture, said: "Given the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza within dairy cattle in many other states, it is not a surprise that we would have a case given the size of our dairy industry in Iowa.

"While lactating dairy cattle appear to recover with supportive care, we know this destructive virus continues to be deadly for poultry."