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NOAH publishes report on One Health opportunities
The report explores how the veterinary industry can support One Health and the UK's sustainability.

The new report recommends future steps for sustainability.

The National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) has published a new report, detailing how the animal health industry can support global One Health and sustainability.

Within the report, the trade association has produced recommendations of how organisations across the industry can contribute to the cause.

Among the recommendations in the report is a regulatory framework for veterinary medicines, which NOAH says would ensure safe medicines stay available and accessible for all animals. The association says that updated UK Veterinary Medicines Regulations would remove unnecessary burdens, and include novel and innovative products.

Furthermore, they have stated the importance that routes for veterinary medicines to market remain available. This would mean that animal owners can continue to access veterinary medicines, with necessary prescription controls.

NOAH has also pushed for better collaboration and partnership between human, animal and environmental sectors in finding sustainable One Health solutions to challenges that affect any sector.

Other recommendations made in NOAH’s report include training for farmers on disease prevention, increased awareness on responsible medicine use, assured funding for development of new medicines and improved diagnostics of diseases in animals.

The guidance has been created with a One Health approach, which suggests that animal, human and environmental health are interconnected and should be considered as a whole. NOAH believes that, by following their recommendations, the veterinary industry will contribute significantly to 10 out of 17 of the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations in its 2030 agenda.

The organisation says that these steps will support the UK with reaching economic viability, holding environmental responsibility and protecting the health of society.

Dawn Howard, NOAH chief executive, said: “The animal health industry is dedicated to a One Health approach to identify and interpret problems, and to find and apply One Health solutions for a healthy balance across all three systems. Achieving this healthy balance is a key element in achieving a sustainable present and future for human and animal health and the health of the planet we share.

“We’re proud to put together this report which outlines examples of where the work of the animal health sector contributes to One Health, and the UK’s sustainability goals.”

The full report can be found here.

Image © NOAH

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Charities' XL bully neutering scheme closes

News Story 1
 A scheme that helped owners of XL bully dogs with the cost of neutering has closed to new applications due to high demand.

The scheme, run by the RSPCA, Blue Cross, and Battersea, has helped 1,800 dogs and their owners after XL bullies were banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

In England and Wales, owners of XL bully dogs which were over one year old on 31 January 2021 have until 30 June 2024 to get their dog neutered. If a dog was between seven months and 12 months old, it must be neutered by 31 December 2024. If it was under seven months old, owners have until 30 June 2025.

More information can be found on the Defra website. 

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News Shorts
Avian flu cattle outbreak spreads to tenth US state

Cattle in two dairy herds in Iowa have tested positive for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), making it the tenth state in the USA to be affected by the ongoing outbreak of the disease in cattle.

Since March 2024, more than 80 herds across the USA have been affected by the virus and three dairy workers have tested positive. Authorities have introduced measures to limit the spread of the virus and farmers have been urged to strengthen their biosecurity protocols.

Mike Naig, Iowa secretary of agriculture, said: "Given the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza within dairy cattle in many other states, it is not a surprise that we would have a case given the size of our dairy industry in Iowa.

"While lactating dairy cattle appear to recover with supportive care, we know this destructive virus continues to be deadly for poultry."