Your data on MRCVSonline
The nature of the services provided by Vision Media means that we might obtain certain information about you.
Please read our Data Protection and Privacy Policy for details.

In addition, (with your consent) some parts of our website may store a 'cookie' in your browser for the purposes of
functionality or performance monitoring.
Click here to manage your settings.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Beavers to be given legal protections in England
The new legislation is scheduled to come into effect in the autumn.

The Wildlife Trusts has welcomed the new legislation.

The Department for Environment, Farming and Rural Affairs (Defra) has announced new legislation that will provide legal protections for beavers in England.

Under the new legislation, it will be an offence to deliberately capture, kill, disturb, injure beavers, or damage their breeding sites or resting places, without a licence.

Wildlife Trusts has welcomed the move, adding that it could lead to the animals being released into the wild under licence. The organisation has long campaigned for sensible management guidance and incentives for landowners to make space for 'nature's engineers' on their land. 

The new legislation is scheduled to come into effect in the autumn, months after the government promised it would be laid in parliament on Tuesday 19th July. 

Alongside the legislation, Natural England is developing guidance on the management of beavers, setting out which actions will or will not require a licence, and where people can go for advice. 

Craig Bennett, chief executive, The Wildlife Trusts, said: “We’re delighted to see the government give beavers the vital protections they deserve. It is important that guidance is now developed quickly to bring farmers and landowners on board with reintroductions of these brilliant animals, providing reassurance and, crucially, incentives to make space for beavers on their land.

“The widespread return of wild beavers can be a game changer for restoring lost wetlands, benefitting all kinds of wildlife, and helping people by holding water back in the landscape, reducing the risk of wildfires and reducing the risk of flooding downstream. Bringing back wild beavers isn’t just a dream, it is a critical part of addressing the climate and nature crises.”

Beavers are a ‘keystone species’, and have a highly positive impact on their environment, bringing benefits to both nature and people. The species was hunted to extinction in the 16th century for its fur, meat and scent glands, which led to the loss of the mosaic of lakes, meres, mires, tarns, and boggy places they were instrumental in creating. 

Harry Barton, chief executive of Devon Wildlife Trust, called for a sensible approach to managing the beaver guidance:

“Our long-term studies demonstrate how spectacularly beneficial beavers are for healthy rivers, creating vital wetland habitat, and helping landscapes adapt to climate change," he said. "It’s a relief that Government has listened to the public and moved forward with these protections, which provide communities across the country with opportunities to benefit from these remarkable creatures

“The legal framework must complement practical and sensible approaches to management. Landowners must also be given the right support and financial motivations to make space for beavers and the valuable wetlands they create.”

Beavers are a ‘keystone species’ and have a highly positive impact on their environment, bringing benefits to both nature and people.

The species was hunted to extinction in the 16th century for its fur, meat and scent glands, and led to the loss of the mosaic of lakes, meres, mires, tarns, and boggy places they were instrumental in creating.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Laura Muir wins gold at Commonwealth Games

News Story 1
 Veterinary surgeon and Olympic silver-medalist Laura Muir scooped the gold medal in the 1500m final Commonwealth Games on Sunday.

Winning Scotland's 12th title of the games, Muir finished in four minutes 2.75 seconds, collecting her second medal in 24 hours.

Dr Muir commented on her win: "I just thought my strength is in my kick and I just tried to trust it and hope nobody would catch me. I ran as hard as I could to the line.

"It is so nice to come here and not just get one medal but two and in such a competitive field. Those girls are fast. It means a lot." 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Views sought on NOAH Compendium

Users of the National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) Compendium app and website are being asked to share their views on how it can be improved.

In a new survey, users are asked about some suggested future developments, such as notifications for new and updated datasheets, sharing links to datasheets, and enhanced search functionality.

It comes after NOAH ceased publication of the NOAH Compendium book as part of its sustainability and environmental commitments. The website and the app will now be the main routes to access datasheets and view any changes.