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Digital animal welfare programme released in Japanese
"By offering people a way to access good quality information, we can ensure they are better able to play their part in providing good welfare for the animals in their care" - Simon Marsh, acting UK director, Wild Welfare.
The resource has been created by UK-based charity Wild Welfare.  

A digital animal welfare programme has been launched in Japanese by the UK animal welfare charity Wild Welfare.

Produced in collaboration with The Jeanne Marchig International Centre for Animal Welfare Education (JMICAWE) at the University of Edinburgh, the free online programme focuses on working with captive wildlife. 

The programme delivers bite-sized online modules on animal behaviour, animal welfare needs and animal enrichment, among other topics, is accessible on smartphones, tablets and computers, and can be taken as a complete course, or one module at a time. 

Simon Marsh, Wild Welfare's acting UK director, commented on the resource: “Ensuring animal welfare resources are available in people’s native languages is vital in helping to make certain our charity’s work really has an impact on captive wildlife in all corners of the globe.

“The Wild About Welfare programme has been designed to upskill staff working with wild animals in captivity and give them the knowledge to be able to deliver good care and welfare.”
Participants of the programme will be provided with practical learning exercises, and will be encouraged to consider species' biology, along with individual preferences, to assist in making positive and productive decisions for each animal's welfare. 

Keiko Yamazaki, executive director of the Animal Literacy Research Institute and member of the Japanese Coalition of Animal Welfare (JCAW) said: “The issues pertaining to captive wildlife in Japan are many. There is no legal definition of zoos. Exotic pets are popular which helps to boost the illegal wildlife trade.

“Educating all those involved in the care of wildlife as well as the general public on the welfare of these animals is of paramount importance to the nation. 
“The digital learning program and its accessibility will indeed help to accelerate this education.”

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VET Festival returns for 2022

News Story 1
 VET Festival, the unique CPD opportunity, is returning for 2022, running from 20 to 21 May.

The outdoor event, held at Loseley Park in Guildford, will feature 17 education streams, with a dedicated stream covering veterinary wellness, leadership and management topics. The festival will feature veterinary speakers from around the world, with the opportunity to collect 14 hours of CPD across the two-day event.

Alongside veterinary education, VET Festival will also offer wellbeing activities such as yoga and mindfulness activities, with the popular VETFest Live Party Night making a return for 2022.

Tickets available here.  

Click here for more...
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Avian influenza housing order declared in Yorkshire

A new avian influenza prevention zone has been declared in North Yorkshire following the identification of H5N1 avian influenza at a number of premises.

The requirement means all bird keepers in Harrogate, Hambleton and Richmondshire are now legally required to keep their birds indoors and follow strict biosecurity measures.

Several other cases of H5N1 avian influenza have also been confirmed in recent days at sites in Essex, Cheshire and Cumbria. On Monday (22 November), the disease was identified near Wells-next-the-Sea, North Norfolk.